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Why oracle doesn't recognize this sentence ? It says "From keyword" wasn't found where expected. What's wrong with it ?

Example:

select distinct a.id = b.id
from table1 a, table2 b
where a.column = X and b.column =Y;

MySQL allows me to do that. So what should I change ?

share|improve this question
1  
What result are you expecting? – APC Feb 28 '13 at 22:53
    
i'm expecting some kind of boolean result, that's i why placed the '=' sign there and didn't use a.id, b.id. – Alejandro Bastidas Feb 28 '13 at 23:00
1  
Okay, that's what I thought. Boolean is not a standard SQL datatype. MySQL has implemented it but Oracle has not. – APC Feb 28 '13 at 23:04
    
Yep, that's what i said "some kind of boolean". i handle it with 1 and 0. – Alejandro Bastidas Feb 28 '13 at 23:23
1  
@APC: actually boolean is a standard SQL datatype (I think it was added with SQL-99). And MySQL does not have a boolean datatype - only a bit datatype which not entirely the same thing. MySQL simply treats zero as false and anything non-zero as true in an expression (which is something completely different than a real boolean type). That's why the (theoretically illegal) statement: delete from foo where 1234 will happily delete all rows from the table. – a_horse_with_no_name Feb 28 '13 at 23:49
up vote 3 down vote accepted

First off, Oracle does not have a boolean data type in SQL (there is a boolean data type in PL/SQL) so a query cannot return a boolean.

You can do something like

select distinct (case when a.id = b.id 
                      then 1
                      else 0
                  end)
  from table1 a, 
       table2 b
 where a.column = X 
   and b.column = Y;

It strikes me as terribly unlikely, however, that you really want to do a Cartesian product between table1 and table2 only to then apply a DISTINCT operator. Frequently, people incorrectly add a DISTINCT to a query when what they really want to do is add another join condition. I would expect that you really want

select distinct (case when a.id = b.id 
                      then 1
                      else 0
                  end)
  from table1 a, 
       table2 b
 where a.some_key = b.some_key
   and a.column = X 
   and b.column = Y;

Once you have the join defined correctly, you may no longer need the expense of the extra DISTINCT.

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Your problem is that a.id = b.id is not valid sql when it's in the select clause.

Edit Below

Given your comment about expecting a boolean result, maybe you are looking for a case construct.

select case when a.id = b.id then 1 else 0 end BooleanResult
from tablea a join tableb b on something
where etc
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Here is it

select distinct a.id, b.id
from table1 a, table2 b
where a.column = X and b.column =Y;
share|improve this answer

You can also use decode in oracle

select distinct (decode (a.id,b.id,1,0)) from table1 a, table2 b
    where a.some_key = b.some_key
    and a.column = X ;
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