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How do I check if a string contains only specified characters using regular expressions?

Example 1: Check if string contains only letters and/or numbers:

What I tried:

Regex rgx = new Regex("[^A-Za-z0-9]");
string s = "This is a string.";

if (rgx.IsMatch(s))
 {
   // true
 }
 else
 {
   // false;
 }

This above example should return false (because I don't want to allow periods), but it is returning true.

Example 2: Only letters and/or numbers and/or spaces and/or parenthesis are allowed:

Regex rgx = new Regex("[^A-Za-z0-9() ]");
string s = "This is a [string].";

if (rgx.IsMatch(s))
 {
   // true
 }
 else
 {
   // false;
 }

Again, the second example should return false (because I don't want to allow brackets or periods), but it is returning true.

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marked as duplicate by Win, DocMax, CloudyMarble, arrowdodger, A.V Mar 1 '13 at 8:03

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your regex is incorrect. What you're checking for

Regex rgx = new Regex("[^A-Za-z0-9]");

will match any single character that is other than an ASCII upper- or lower-case letter or decimal digit. If you want to check that a string consists solely of letters and numbers, you can say:

Regex rx = new Regex("^[A-Za-z0-9]+$");

The above regular expression will match the start-of-line anchor (^), followed by a letter or digit ( [A-Za-z0-9]) repeated 1 or more times (+), followed by the end-of-line anchor ($).

One should note that spaces and punctuation count: in your original example, the test string will match one the first character found other than an upper- or lower-case letter or decimal digit, the SP (space) character at offset +4.

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The ^ symbol in your regular expression basically means "NOT ...", so by removing that we have a good start. You also want to make sure that strings longer than one character is possible, and by adding a plus sign afterwards, we tell the expression to look for matches '1 character or longer'. And last, by adding ^ before the bracket, and $ after the plus sign, the expression must match the entire string, and not just parts of it.

That is:

Regex rgx = new Regex("^[A-Za-z0-9() ]+$");
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The carat character (^) indicates that you want to match all characters that are not in the brackets.

In the first example it matches on the period (.).

In the second example it matches on the brackets([]) and period (.).

You just need to flip your logic. If a true is returned, then you know that the string does contain illegal characters.

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