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Aloha, I have been trying to figure out how to replace/insert text strings between two place holders.

#start
REPLACE ANYTHING IN HERE
#end

Originally I was trying to do this with BASH via sed, but hit a road-block when I tried to pass a variable to sed.

sed -n -i '/#start/{p;:a;N;/#end/!ba;s/.*\n/hello\n/};p' file.txt

Returns

#start
hello
#end

but no joy when I try

sed -n -i '/#start/{p;:a;N;/#end/!ba;s/.*\n/$replace_var\n/};p' file.txt

or

sed -n -i "/#start/{p;:a;N;/#end/!ba;s/.*\n/$replace_var\n/};p" file.txt

I've been at this for hours, and have searched around but have not found a solution. I'm up to trying in python or another language, or maybe with awk. I'm kind of new in this realm so any useful information would be appreciated.

Thanks in advance

This is what I went with in the end. It's a script that in conjunction with cron, updates my /var/etc/hosts.deny file with the latest published ssh blocklist.

import re
import urllib2

hosts_deny = open('/etc/hosts.deny','r+')
hosts_deny_text = hosts_deny.read()

blockedHosts = urllib2.urlopen('http://www.openbl.org/lists/hosts.deny').read()
place = re.compile('(?<=#start)(\r?\n)'
                   '(.*?)'
                   '(?=\r?\n#end)',re.DOTALL)#DOTALL enables '.' to also include
                                             #a new line
hosts_deny_text = re.sub(place, '\n'+ blockedHosts, hosts_deny_text)
hosts_deny.seek(0)
hosts_deny.write(hosts_deny_text)
hosts_deny.close()
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Nice first question :) –  squiguy Feb 28 '13 at 23:04

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Given what you explain, I can only propose this simple code:

import re

ss = '''qslkjqskqsdhf
#start
REPLACE ANYTHING IN HERE
#end
2135468761265
'''

reg = re.compile('(?<=#start)(\r?\n)'
                 '(.*?)'
                 '(?=\r?\n#end)',re.DOTALL)

print ss
print '----'
print reg.sub('\\1Ia orana',ss)

result

qslkjqskqsdhf
#start
REPLACE ANYTHING IN HERE
#end
2135468761265

----
qslkjqskqsdhf
#start
Ia orana
#end
2135468761265
share|improve this answer
    
Based on his question, I think he wants to keep #start and #end in there (at least his example shows that). That could be achieved, by positive look-behind and look-ahead: r'(?<=#start\n)(.*?)(?=\n#end)'. –  Stjepan Bakrac Feb 28 '13 at 23:11
    
@StjepanBakrac: … or just by adding them back in, either hard-coded, or by matching them and using \1 and \2. –  abarnert Feb 28 '13 at 23:13
    
Yes I do want the placeholders to remain - I will keep in mind to better define the problem in the future. I thought to do as you suggested and just add them back in by appending them to the "replacement text" but I am intrigued by this look-behind/ahead. I was imagining something like that earlier when I was thinking of how to express to sed what bit of the file I wanted. –  I-Ii Feb 28 '13 at 23:26
    
@abarnert Obviously, but regular expression engines provide a comprehensive feature-set for a reason. Look-behind and look-ahead are precisely for situations like these. Matching them, then including them again in the substitution to make up for it is a roundabout approach. –  Stjepan Bakrac Feb 28 '13 at 23:28
    
@Stjepan Thank you. I made your reputation to pass 500 in your more upvoted answer ! –  eyquem Feb 28 '13 at 23:29

This does seem to do what you want:

sed -ie "/#start/,/#end/{/#start/b;/#end/b;s/.*/$replace_var/;}" file.txt

The inner /#start/band /#end/b skip those lines, otherwise you'd replace them as well.

share|improve this answer
    
This will replace every line between the markers with $replace_var, I don't think that is what the OP wants. –  Thor Feb 28 '13 at 23:29
    
Could you help me read this. I believe in the power of regex, but as it is a rather complex concept I have found my learning curve to be a bit shallow? Many thanks. –  I-Ii Feb 28 '13 at 23:31
    
@Jason: The first pair of patterns makes it apply what's in the {...} from #start to #end, anything else is just passed through. Within the {}s we branch (b) to the end of the script if the line contains #start or #end so we let those through unchanged too. Anything between the #start and #end line makes it through the s/// to be changed. (That appeared to be what you wanted in your original question (since edited) but you can, of course, make it more selective.) –  William Feb 28 '13 at 23:55
    
@William thank you so much for explaining that, I am going to try with this method as well. I love one liners. –  I-Ii Mar 1 '13 at 0:52

I think sed is rather unsuited for this task, I would use awk instead:

awk '!f; /#start/ { f=1; print repl } /#end/ { f=0; print }' repl="$replace_var" file.txt

The f variable is a flag that keeps track of when we're within the markers. !f invokes the default block ({print $0}) and prints everything outside the markers including the #start marker.

Testing

Test-file copied from eyquem's answer:

cat << EOF > file.txt
qslkjqskqsdhf
#start
REPLACE ANYTHING IN HERE
#end
2135468761265
EOF

Replace inter-marker content with hello\nhello:

awk '!f; /#start/ { f=1; print repl } /#end/ { f=0; print }' repl="$(printf 'hello\nhello')" file.txt

Output:

qslkjqskqsdhf
#start
hello
hello
#end
2135468761265
share|improve this answer

You could read the file into a string and then do:

sstart = s.split(start)
for i in range(len(s)):
   if i%2 ==1:
      send = sstart[i].split(end)
      for i in range(len(send)):
           if i%2 == 0:
                send[i] = REPLACEMENT
      sstart[i] = send.join()
s = sstart.join()

so you're basically walking through the list, cutting out the part that need replacement, and then gluing the parts back together.

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With a "dotall" regexp, this is easy. These are easy with Perl, Python, PCRE, etc. For example, in Python:

>>> s = '''#start
... REPLACE ANYTHING IN HERE
... #end'''
>>> re.sub(r'(?s)(#start\n).*?\n(#end)',
           r'\1hello\n\2', s)
'#start\nhello\n#end'

Obviously matching the start and end lines and replacing them with themselves is overkill, but I decided to keep it general in case you wanted to extend it further.

I used the (?s) instead of passing a re.DOTALL flag so everything would be self-contained, and you wouldn't have to think about the differences between how Perl, Python, etc. pass flags. But in real life it's usually more readable to use the flags instead of embedding them.

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