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I am asking a side-question about the method I learned here from @redmode :

Subsetting based on values of a different data frame in R

When I try to dynamically adjust the level I want to subset by:

N <- nrow(A)
cond <- sapply(3:N, function(i) sum(A[i,] > 0.95*B[i,])==2)
rbind(A[1:2,], subset(A[3:N,], cond))

I get an error

Error in FUN(left, right) : non-numeric argument to binary operator. 

Can you think of a way I can get rows pertaining to values in A that are greater than 95% of the value in B? Thank you.

Here is code for A and B to play with.

A <- structure(list(name1 = c("trt", "0", "1", "10", "1", "1", "10"
), name2 = c("ctrl", "3", "1", "1", "1", "1", "10")), .Names = c("name1", 
"name2"), row.names = c("cond", "hour", "A", "B", "C", "D", "E"
), class = "data.frame")
B <- structure(list(name1 = c("trt", "0", "1", "1", "1", "1", "9.4"), 
    name2 = c("ctrl", "3", "1", "10", "1", "1", "9.4")), .Names = c("name1", 
"name2"), row.names = c("cond", "hour", "A", "B", "C", "D", "E"
), class = "data.frame")
share|improve this question
    
Can you supply small examples of A, B and what you're result should be. It looks like maybe A and B are one-column data.frames? And you want to keep rows 1 and 2 in A along with all rows of A which are greater than 95% of corresponding rows of B? –  N8TRO Feb 28 '13 at 23:10
    
Your data is all characters. class(B[1,2]) #[1] "character" Your rows cons and hour should be part of the column names. –  N8TRO Feb 28 '13 at 23:40

1 Answer 1

You have some serious formatting issues with your data.

First, columns should be of the same data type, rows should be observations. (not always true, but a very good way to start) Here you have a row called cond, then a row called hour, then a series of classifications I'm guessing. The way you're data is presented to begin with doesn't make much sense and doesn't lend itself to easy manipulation of your data. But all is not lost. This is what I would do:

Reorganize my data:

C <- data.frame(matrix(as.numeric(unlist(A)), ncol=2)[-(1:2), ])

colnames(C) <- c('A.trt', 'A.cntr')
rownames(C) <- LETTERS[1:nrow(C)]

D <- data.frame(matrix(as.numeric(unlist(B)), ncol=2)[-(1:2), ])

colnames(D) <- c('B.trt', 'B.cntr')

(df <- cbind(C, D))

Which gives:

#   A.trt A.cntr B.trt B.cntr
# A     1      1   1.0    1.0
# B    10      1   1.0   10.0
# C     1      1   1.0    1.0
# D     1      1   1.0    1.0
# E    10     10   9.4    9.4

Then you're problem is easily solved by:

df[which(df[, 1] > 0.95*df[, 3] & df[, 2] > 0.95*df[, 4]), ]

#   A.trt A.cntr B.trt B.cntr
# A     1      1   1.0    1.0
# C     1      1   1.0    1.0
# D     1      1   1.0    1.0
# E    10     10   9.4    9.4
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the help, but my real data has hundreds of rows, and I don't feel like indexing them one-by-one. Yes my data is poorly organized. I wish I knew how to make hour and cond into factors. Something like reshape's melt command probably would help. –  chimpsarehungry Mar 1 '13 at 5:16
    
@chimpsarehungry This can easily be generalized, maybe if you post a new question with sample data that really represents your data. The real idea is to not mix data types and organize it so that subsequent operations are easy. –  N8TRO Mar 2 '13 at 3:12

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