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function f() {
  function makeClosure(x) {
    return function(){
      return x;
    }
  }
  var a = [];
  var i;
  for(i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
    a[i] = makeClosure(i);
  }
  return a;
}

var gg = f()
gg[1]()

I am so close to understanding closure I can taste it :)... I get the mechanics, I am still just having a bit of trouble conceptualizing.

I am sure this is a big time oversimplification, but in the case above is it accurate to think about what is happening in the following way?

  1. function f() is called
  2. function makeClosure is called and is given the argument index [1]
  3. function makeClosure calls anonymous function and gives it argument index [1]
  4. for statement starts
  5. for statements iterates then calls function makeClosure
  6. function makeclosure then tests if the argument index [0] matches the anonymous function's argument
  7. the makeClosure function and anonymous functions do not match
  8. loop is iterated a second time producing the argument index [1]
  9. function makeclosure then tests if the argument index [1] matches the anonymous function's argument
  10. they match
  11. the makeClosure function is exited and function f() returns the var a which is at this point saved as the number 1

Sorry if it's long winded, I just want to make my understanding isn't entirely flawed. thank you!

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closed as unclear what you're asking by Niet the Dark Absol, AlienWebguy, xdazz, Lipis, Maverick Mar 6 at 5:39

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
So much info out there on closures. Are you stuck on something? This site is for "my code is foo, I expect bar, it returns bat - what's wrong?" –  AlienWebguy Mar 1 '13 at 0:50
    
just a beginner wanting to double check with the pros on my understanding. I apologize if my question is not within the scope of this site. –  user2117138 Mar 1 '13 at 0:54
    
Erm, there are some wrongs with your methodology. There's no "calling" to any anonymous function before the for starts. There is no indexes matching, rather just passing arguments around and different IIFEs returned inside different Execution Contexts which work due to lexical scope. –  Fabrício Matté Mar 1 '13 at 1:06
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2 Answers

Since this is a question looking for a general understanding of closures, here's the general rule.

If a function is declared within another function as opposed to invoked (this is an important distinction), the inner function has access to the scope of the function it is declared in.

Now to the specifics of this question. Everything after point 6 looks like it's for different code than what is currently posted. So I'm going to just describe what the loop is doing instead.

The loop goes from 0 to 2, filling an array with functions. In the scope of these functions they respectively have the values 0, 1, and 2. Therefore the final line gg[1]() invokes the function at array index 1 which returns the value 1.

Another way to conceptualize this is that during the loop an object with property x is created. This object has one nameless method which returns x.

Hope this gives you some better insight into what exactly a closure is. Personally I like to think of closures as a scoping rule and not necessarily as a type of object.

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Thanks MushinNoshin, I guess this line kind of hits on what I am getting at "The loop goes from 0 to 2, filling an array with functions". Where is this array stored? Inside the anon function? And if so, when does the loop actually start? when the f() function is invoked? –  user2117138 Mar 1 '13 at 1:23
    
That loop is executed as part of f()'s invocation. That array is stored as part of the scope of f(). When f() is invoked, it's internal members are built anew and when it's finished they effectively leave scope unless they are still referenced by something. If we follow that line of questioning we start getting into garbage collection :) –  MushinNoShin Mar 1 '13 at 1:34
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  1. function f() is called

Firstly, an environment for global code is established and the declarations for f and gg are processed. Then statement assigning to gg, which causes f to be called.

2. function makeClosure is called and is given the argument index [1]

Not yet. The function is called after the loop starts (#5).

When f is called, a new execution context is created and its environment estabished, makeClosure, a and i are created as a local variables, the global object is placed on its scope chain. Then a is assigned a new empy array.

3. function makeClosure calls anonymous function and gives it argument index [1]

There are no calls inside makeClosure.

4. for statement starts . 5. for statements iterates then calls function makeClosure

This happens before 2.

makeClosure is called initially with a value of 0.

When makeClosure is called, a new execution context is created. It has one formal parameter x that is assigned a value of 0 the first time, 1 the second, and so on.

The scope chain for makeClosure has the execution object for f on it, so it has access to all of f's parameters and variables. Samed-named identifiers are "shaddowed" by local ones.

At each call, makeClosure returns a function object that has no variables or formal parameters. These function objects have a scope chain that is defined at the point they are created and includes themselves, then the instance of makeClosure's execution context, then f's, then the global execution context.

The returned function object is assigned to a member of a.

6. function makeclosure then tests if the argument index [0] matches the anonymous function's argument 7. the makeClosure function and anonymous functions do not match 8. loop is iterated a second time producing the argument index [1] 9. function makeclosure then tests if the argument index [1] matches the anonymous function's argument 10. they match 11. the makeClosure function is exited and function f() returns the var a which is at this point saved as the number 1

None of that happens. For each loop, a new call to makeClosure is made so a new function is returned with a different makeClosure execution object instance on its scope chain. These are assigned to members of a.

The for loop iterates 3 times, where i has the value 0, 1 then 2. When i gets to 3 it exits before executing.

12. A reference to the array (a) is returned and assigned to the global g.

13. g[1] is called. This references the second returned function, which is then called. When the identifier x inside that function is resolved on its scope chain, the x inside the instance of makeClosure that created it is found. That corresponds to the one created with a value of 1, so that x has a value of 1, which is returned.

I've probably messed something up, but that's more or less what's going on.

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Thanks for the detailed answert Rob - very helpful! –  user2117138 Mar 1 '13 at 16:54
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