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I'm attempting to gather some data using C#. I have a system that outputs data in a unique, non standard way. I need to parse this data from a flat file regularly, and import it into a database. I also need to have the parsing happen as fast as possible. The database stuff I have working fine, that's simple. I need help figuring out the best way to parse the file. Presently, there are ~15000 lines, and more are added each day. Here's a look at the data. The first line is the way the data is presented in a flat file. The second bit is a simpler to understand view of the data being imported.

{a test entry}  {{1}{{city}{chicago}{employee}{johnsmith}{building}{5}{room}{506A}{room}{506B}{id}{1234}}{2}{{city}{losangeles}{employee}{johnsmith}{building}{1}{room}{101A}{room}{102B}{id}{1234}}}

{a test entry}
{
    {1}

    {
        {city}      {chicago}
        {employee}  {johnsmith}
        {building}  {5}
        {room}      {506A}
        {room}      {506B}
        {id}        {1234}
    }

    {2}

    {
        {city}      {losangeles}
        {employee}  {johnsmith}
        {building}  {1}
        {room}      {101A}
        {id}        {1234}
    }
}

Each entry can be anywhere from one subentry (meaning no data under {2}), or it can go on to have hundreds.

How the heck should I handle parsing this? I've attempted some stuff with splitting and substring, but I'm having varied successes, and it's slow.

Is there any way I can simply parse the data I'm looking at?

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Looks fairly straight-forward so far. Is it safe to assume that each entry is basically an array of objects with the same basic properties? Does the format have any way of identifying the brace characters in a string - escaping of some sort? –  Corey Mar 1 '13 at 1:25
    
What's an example of line 2? –  Monso Mar 1 '13 at 1:42
    
Other than it looks like you can have a duplicate key, "room" in your example, it looks fairly similar to JSON and you can probably adept it fairly easily. (Or cheat and use <= v1.6 JSON which allows duplicate keys) JSON will give you an object you can dive into or deserialize into an object if you know the structure so you could make a class. –  Monso Mar 1 '13 at 2:00
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Create a stack and process the input string character by character:

var stack = new Stack<StringBuilder>();
foreach (var ch in input)
{
    if (ch == '{')
    {
        stack.Push(new StringBuilder());
    }
    else if (ch == '}')
    {
        var item = stack.Pop().ToString();
        Console.WriteLine(new string(' ', stack.Count * 2) + item);
    }
    else if (stack.Count != 0)
    {
        stack.Peek().Append(ch);
    }
}

Output:

a test entry
  1
    city
    chicago
    employee
    johnsmith
    building
    5
    room
    506A
    room
    506B
    id
    1234

  2
    city
    losangeles
    employee
    johnsmith
    building
    1
    room
    101A
    room
    102B
    id
    1234

Now that you have parsed the data, you just need to figure what data structure to put it into.

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2  
@PieterGeerkens: A tokenizer would return a stream of lexical symbols, like, { a test entry } { { 1 } {... My code does a bit more, it actually parses the input. You are right that it doesn't deserialize the data into a data structure. But without knowing what kind of data structure the OP needs, it's somewhat difficult to suggest this part (and, tbh, asking for a complete solution with a data model and everything is a bit too much to ask imho). –  dtb Mar 1 '13 at 1:54
    
I think this will work. I can tweak it a bit to fit my needs. Thanks –  Justin Popa Mar 1 '13 at 5:05
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What about something like this:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    int index = 0;
    string text = "{a test entry}  {{1}{{city}{chicago}{employee}{johnsmith}{building}{5}{room}{506A}{room}{506B}{id}{1234}}{2}{{city}{losangeles}{employee}{johnsmith}{building}{1}{room}{101A}{room}{102B}{id}{1234}}}";

    var tokens = Tokenize(text);        
    var node = Parse(new Node(new Token() { TokenType = TokenType.Root, Value = string.Empty }), tokens, ref index);
    RaiseSubtrees(node);

    Console.WriteLine(node.ToString());
}

static List<Token> Tokenize(string text)
{
    Stack<StringBuilder> stack = new Stack<StringBuilder>();
    List<Token> tokens = new List<Token>();

    foreach (var ch in text)
    {
        if (ch == '{')
        {
            stack.Push(new StringBuilder());
            tokens.Add(new Token(TokenType.ObjectStart, "{" ));
        }
        else if (ch == '}')
        {
            var item = stack.Pop().ToString();

            if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(item))
            {
                tokens.Add(new Token(TokenType.Text, item));
            }

            tokens.Add(new Token(TokenType.ObjectEnd, "}"));
        }
        else if (stack.Count != 0)
        {
            stack.Peek().Append(ch);
        }
    }

    return tokens;
}

static Node Parse(Node parent, List<Token> tokens, ref int index)
{
    for (; index < tokens.Count - 1; index++)
    {
        Token current = tokens[index];
        Token next = tokens[index + 1];

        if (current.TokenType == TokenType.ObjectStart)
        {
            Node child = new Node(current);
            parent.Children.Add(child);
            index++;
            Parse(child, tokens, ref index);
        }
        else if (current.TokenType == TokenType.Entry || current.TokenType == TokenType.Text)
        {
            Node child = new Node(current);
            parent.Children.Add(child);
        }
        else if (current.TokenType == TokenType.ObjectEnd)
        {
            return parent;
        }
    }

    return parent;
}

static void RaiseSubtrees(Node node)
{
    if (node.Children.Count == 1)
    {
        node.Token = node.Children.First().Token;
        node.Children.Clear();
    }
    else
    {
        foreach (Node child in node.Children)
        {
            RaiseSubtrees(child);
        }

        if (node.Children.All(c => c.Token.TokenType == TokenType.Text))
        {
            for (int i = node.Children.Count - 1; i >= 1; i-=2)
            {
                Node keyNode = node.Children[i - 1];
                Node valueNode = node.Children[i];
                keyNode.Token.TokenType = TokenType.Key;
                valueNode.Token.TokenType = TokenType.Value;

                Node newParent = new Node(new Token(TokenType.Property, string.Empty));
                newParent.Children.Add(keyNode);
                newParent.Children.Add(valueNode);

                node.Children.RemoveAt(i);
                node.Children.RemoveAt(i - 1);
                node.Children.Insert(i - 1, newParent);
            }
        }
    }
}

enum TokenType
{
    Entry,
    Key,
    ObjectStart,
    ObjectEnd,
    Property,
    Root,
    Text,
    Value
}

class Token
{
    public TokenType TokenType { get; set; }
    public string Value { get; set; }

    public Token()
    {
    }

    public Token(TokenType tokenType, string value)
    {
        this.TokenType = tokenType;
        this.Value = value;
    }
}

class Node
{
    public Token Token { get; set; }
    public IList<Node> Children { get; set; }

    public Node(Token token)
    {
        this.Token = token;
        this.Children = new List<Node>();
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
        ToString(this, builder, string.Empty);

        return builder.ToString();
    }

    public void ToString(Node parent, StringBuilder builder, string indent)
    {
        builder.Append(indent).Append(parent.Token.TokenType.ToString());

        if (parent.Token.TokenType != TokenType.Root && parent.Token.TokenType != TokenType.ObjectStart)
        {
            builder.Append(": ").Append(parent.Token.Value);
        }

        builder.Append("\n");

        foreach (var child in parent.Children)
        {
            ToString(child, builder, indent + "  ");
        }
    }
}

This uses a similar approach to dtb for the tokenization, but I then use the Node class to create a tree that models the data. This should allow you to handle the data in a more structured way. The output of the Main method above looks like this:

Root
  Text: a test entry
  ObjectStart
    Text: 1
    ObjectStart
      Property:
        Key: city
        Value: chicago
      Property:
        Key: employee
        Value: johnsmith
      Property:
        Key: building
        Value: 5
      Property:
        Key: room
        Value: 506A
      Property:
        Key: room
        Value: 506B
      Property:
        Key: id
        Value: 1234
    Text: 2
    ObjectStart
      Property:
        Key: city
        Value: losangeles
      Property:
        Key: employee
        Value: johnsmith
      Property:
        Key: building
        Value: 1
      Property:
        Key: room
        Value: 101A
      Property:
        Key: room
        Value: 102B
      Property:
        Key: id
        Value: 1234
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