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This question already has an answer here:

I have a string that looks like this:

 GenFiltEff=7.092200e-01

Using bash, I would like to just get the number after the = character. Is there a way to do this?

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marked as duplicate by tripleee bash Feb 18 at 8:56

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

up vote 16 down vote accepted
cut -d "=" -f 2 <<< "$your_str"

or

sed -e 's#.*=\(\)#\1#' <<< "$your_str"
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1  
Good for simple cases, however these methods don't play well when there is more than one "=" in the string. Chepner's first solution is simple and more reliable. – lepe Dec 27 '14 at 4:40
    
What is the fatest way to do it ? cut, sed or other ? – Lord of dark Mar 17 at 15:05

Use parameter expansion, if the value is already stored in a variable.

$ str="GenFiltEff=7.092200e-01"
$ value=${str#*=}

Or use read

$ IFS="=" read name value <<< "GenFiltEff=7.092200e-01"

Either way,

$ echo $value
7.092200e-01
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2  
If the string has more than one "=": ${str##*=} to get from the last match. ${str#*=} to get from the first match. ${str%%=*} to get until the first match. ${str%=*} to get until the last match. [String Manipulation @ tldp.org] (tldp.org/LDP/abs/html/string-manipulation.html) – lepe Dec 27 '14 at 4:36
echo "GenFiltEff=7.092200e-01" | cut -d "=" -f2 
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This should work:

your_str='GenFiltEff=7.092200e-01'
echo $your_str | cut -d "=" -f2
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${word:$(expr index "$word" "="):1}

that gets the 7. Assuming you mean the entire rest of the string, just leave off the :1.

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