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One of the Spring features I like the most is how you can handle properties loaded from a file. You only to need to set up a bean like the one below

<bean id="propertyConfigurer" 
      class="org.springframework.beans.factory.config.PropertyPlaceholderConfigurer">
  <property name="location" value="/WEB-INF/app.properties" />
</bean> 

Now you are able to inject the properties values loaded from the app.properties into your beans by using either xml (see below) or annotations.

<bean class="com.example.PersonDaoImpl">
    <property name="maxResults" value="${results.max}"/>
</bean>

results.max is one of the properties.

I'm great fan of this feature because it enables me to create quite flexible applications that I can turn on/off some functionality by only changing one property - without redeploying the app.

Now I'm working with JBoss Seam and I've been struggling to find a way to do something similar using this framework.

Does anyone know how to do it? If not, does anyone have any idea of how I could handle properties in a nice way using Seam (I have seen some ways - but none of them were good enough).

Thanks.

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1 Answer 1

If there's no appropriate way using you software stack (is there really no dependency injection!?). I'd say: Use Google Guice (https://code.google.com/p/google-guice/ , https://code.google.com/p/google-guice/wiki/Motivation?tm=6)!

Bad thing with Guice: You may have to read a lot to understand how it works, and what you can do with it. But after it's running you will simply inject your Properties object where you need it:

class YourClass {
  @Inject Properties myProperties;

  @Inject
  public YourClass() { ... }

  public void someMethod() {
    use the property
  }
}

or if you need the properties inside the constructor, you could also do:

class YourClass {
  final Properties myProperties;

  @Inject
  public YourClass(Properties myProperties) { 
    this.myProperties = myProperties;
  }

  public void someMethod() {
    use the property
  }
}

Using Guice maybe enforces you to refactor your whole app.

But if you already have some DI framework, you should simply use that :)

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