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I'm looking for a SQL-injection-secure technique to insert a lot of rows (ca. 2000) at once with PHP and MYSQLi.
I have an array with all the values that have to be include. Currently I'm doing that:

$array = array("array", "with", "about", "2000", "values");

foreach ($array as $one) 
{
    $query = "INSERT INTO table (link) VALUES ( ?)";
    $stmt = $mysqli->prepare($query);
    $stmt ->bind_param("s", $one);
    $stmt->execute();
    $stmt->close();
}

I tried call_user_func_array , but it caused a stackoverflow.

What is faster method to do this (like inserting them all at once?), but still secure against SQL-Injections (Liken a prepared statement) and Stack-Overflows?
Thank you!

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1 prepare, N executions –  zerkms Mar 1 '13 at 1:58
1  
But will it really gonna be faster, if I put I loop on the execute? –  Copy Devil Mar 1 '13 at 2:00
    
what if you try? –  zerkms Mar 1 '13 at 2:01

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You should be able to greatly increase the speed by putting your inserts inside a transaction. You can also move your prepare and bind statements outside of your loop.

$array = array("array", "with", "about", "2000", "values");
$query = "INSERT INTO table (link) VALUES (?)";
$stmt = $mysqli->prepare($query);
$stmt ->bind_param("s", $one);

$mysqli->query("START TRANSACTION");
foreach ($array as $one) {
    $stmt->execute();
}
$stmt->close();
$mysqli->query("COMMIT");

Edit:

I tested this code with 10,000 iterations on my web server.

Without transaction: 226 seconds. With transaction: 2 seconds. Or a two order of magnitude speed increase, at least for that test.

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1  
a magic: SET GLOBAL innodb_flush_log_at_trx_commit = 0; then test w/o transaction again ;-) –  Your Common Sense Mar 1 '13 at 13:03
    
...or just use MyISAM –  Your Common Sense Mar 1 '13 at 13:24
    
@YourCommonSense That does reduce the time down to 2 seconds without a transaction, although based on the docs for that setting it seems like it shouldn't be identical to the speed of a transaction, is not the default, and may not be super safe. Am I reading that wrong (or is there another question that goes into this?) –  Dan Metheus Mar 1 '13 at 13:39
    
@YourCommonSense Also thank you for that setting, for my purposes losing a second's worth of transactions isn't a big risk and it has sped up several things on my server since very few apps are explicitly using transactions it seems. –  Dan Metheus Mar 1 '13 at 13:52
    
Don't forget to set it permanent then. this setting indeed slows down writes with innodb. –  Your Common Sense Mar 1 '13 at 14:34

Trying this again, I don't see why your original code won't work with minor modifications:

$query = "INSERT INTO table (link) VALUES (?)";
$stmt = $mysqli->prepare($query);
$stmt->bind_param("s", $one);

foreach ($array as $one) {
    $stmt->execute();
}
$stmt->close();
share|improve this answer
    
What about not using prepared statement, and insert the values in the SQL-Query directly, whitout binding and using mysql_real_escape_string? –  Copy Devil Mar 1 '13 at 2:09
1  
@Copy Devil: you're trying to solve a real task or just trying to think of the most weird solution? –  zerkms Mar 1 '13 at 2:11
    
I'm sorry^^ I'm just thinking about the insert speed, if the values are inserted at once compared to many executions. –  Copy Devil Mar 1 '13 at 2:12
    
@Copy Devil: the performance-related questions should be accompanied with measurements and requirements. What are the current performance requirements and what is the performance of the most straightforward (well designed and readable) solution (the one from this answer)? A note: "as fast as possible" isn't a requirement –  zerkms Mar 1 '13 at 2:13
1  
I agree with @Mike. mysql_real_escape_string won't be as secure, and you specified security as a top concern. Nothing beats parameterizing the queries –  Explosion Pills Mar 1 '13 at 2:15

Yes, you can build a single big query manually, with something like:

$query = "";
foreach ($array as $curvalue) {
  if ($query)
    $query .= ",";
  $query .= "('" . $mysqli->real_escape_string($curvalue) . "')";
}
if ($query) {
  $query = "INSERT INTO table (link) VALUES " . $query;
  $mysqli->query($query);
}
share|improve this answer
    
And how vulnerable is real_escape_string? I always used prepared statements so far. –  Copy Devil Mar 1 '13 at 2:16
    
Prepared statements with strings essentially do exactly the same thing as real_escape_string. The difference is that it is generally a lot more code and easier to make mistakes using real_escape_string. –  Mark Ormston Mar 1 '13 at 2:16
    
So? I'm a little confused from the comments of the answers now. I'm not sure I accepted the right answer^^ Which of the two answers is faster? And is real_escape really as secure as prepared statements? –  Copy Devil Mar 1 '13 at 2:19
    
I can tell you that my method with the big INSERT as the only back and forth you do with the server will be significantly faster than doing 2000+ inserts separately. As for security, I am unaware of a properly done escaped string being less secure in any case than a prepare, it is just much easier to make mistakes. If anybody knows better, please feel free to comment! –  Mark Ormston Mar 1 '13 at 2:21
    
You COULD also get the best of both worlds and use one single query as a prepared statement binding the values dynamically. –  Mike Mar 1 '13 at 2:42

There are no security benefit of doing parametrized queries. Properly formatted query is as secure as prepared one. As long as you're adding only strings to the query, mysql_real_escape_string is okay.
The only problem with this honest function is developers who are using it to format values of different types, for which it's completely useless (and dangerous), or just forgetting to use it.

So, we can combine two worlds - the world of manual formatting and world of prepared statements, taking the idea of placeholder from the latter.

$array = array("array", "with", "about", "2000", "values");
foreach ($array as $one) {
    $ins[] = $db->parse("(?s)",$one);
}
$instr = implode(",",$ins);
$db->query("INSERT INTO table VALUES ?p",$instr);

However, if you don't like the idea of having an abstraction library to do all the dirty job for you, this solution is not for you.

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