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I have an example dataframe:

       Date      p
4   2001-01-04  6.9
5   2001-01-05  4.5
6   2001-01-06  5.9
8   2001-01-08 15.8
24  2001-01-24  1.3
25  2001-01-25  4.6
26  2001-01-26 13.0
27  2001-01-27 45.1
32  2001-02-01  5.0
36  2001-02-05 21.9
37  2001-02-06 25.4
40  2001-02-09  1.4
41  2001-02-10  1.9
44  2001-02-13  9.1
45  2001-02-14 23.0
46  2001-02-15  8.8
53  2001-02-22  1.1
59  2001-02-28 24.8

I want to subset dataframe when there is 3 consecutive days with their related p values such as dates:(2001-01-04,2001-01-05,2001-01-06) with their p values(6.9,4.5,5.9).I have huge dataframe which I wrote part of it here and I need only 3 consecutive days to be selected.

Any help on the above problems would be greatly appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
The conditions that make your subset are very unclear. How are the p-values in your example relevant to being subset? And I'm guessing you mean 'contiguous' not 'continues'. –  N8TRO Mar 1 '13 at 2:04
2  
Your use of the English language seems to be a problem. Can you describe what you want to happen when there are three dates in sequence, the word being sequential or contiguous and not "continues". Do you want the last three dates of that sequence or all of the sequences with a run of dates greater than or equal to 3 dates? –  BondedDust Mar 1 '13 at 2:04
    
I think the OP is trying to extract subsets of rows where there are three consecutive days, and to include the p value in the extracted subset. And perhaps also to indicate a grouping of these rows as being in the same three-day block? –  Gary Weissman Mar 1 '13 at 2:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This constructs a diff() vector and picks out the runs with length >= 2. It then shift that vector back one and do a logical OR since the first item in a run will have a FALSE value for rle()$value==1

dat$Date <- as.Date(dat$Date)
dat$diff <- c(0, diff(dat$Date))
datrl <- rle(dat$diff)  # Inadvertently omitted this line in initial posting
grp <- rep(seq_along(datrl$lengths), datrl$lengths)* 
       rep(datrl$values==1, datrl$lengths)*
       rep(datrl$lengths>=2, datrl$lengths)
dat[ grp | c(grp[-1], 0) , ]

#----
>  dat[ grp | c(grp[-1], 0) , ][1:3.]
         Date    p diff
1  2001-01-04  6.9    0
2  2001-01-05  4.5    1
3  2001-01-06  5.9    1
5  2001-01-24  1.3   16
6  2001-01-25  4.6    1
7  2001-01-26 13.0    1
8  2001-01-27 45.1    1
14 2001-02-13  9.1    3
15 2001-02-14 23.0    1
16 2001-02-15  8.8    1
share|improve this answer
    
I think you forget to put one step I couldn't understand what is "datrl".can you write how you define "datrl"? –  user1954153 Mar 2 '13 at 5:57
    
You are quite right. Fixed. –  BondedDust Mar 2 '13 at 16:45

Assuming you want list of 3 consecutive date subsets.

data <- read.table(textConnection("Date      p\n2001-01-04  6.9\n2001-01-05  4.5\n2001-01-06  5.9\n2001-01-08 15.8\n2001-01-24  1.3\n2001-01-25  4.6\n2001-01-26 13.0\n2001-01-27 45.1\n2001-02-01  5.0\n2001-02-05 21.9\n2001-02-06 25.4\n2001-02-09  1.4\n2001-02-10  1.9\n2001-02-13  9.1\n2001-02-14 23.0\n2001-02-15  8.8\n2001-02-22  1.1\n2001-02-28 24.8"), 
    header = TRUE, colClasses = c("Date", "numeric"))

# find out which dates are 3rd consecutive dates. sel below is logical vector indicating such dates
sel <- c(0, diff(data$Date)) == 1 & c(0, 0, diff(data$Date, 2) == 2)

# get start and end dates
start <- which(sel) - 2
end <- which(sel)

# get all the 3 consecutive dates subsets
mapply(function(start, end) data[start:end, ], start, end, SIMPLIFY = FALSE)
## [[1]]
##         Date   p
## 1 2001-01-04 6.9
## 2 2001-01-05 4.5
## 3 2001-01-06 5.9
## 
## [[2]]
##         Date    p
## 5 2001-01-24  1.3
## 6 2001-01-25  4.6
## 7 2001-01-26 13.0
## 
## [[3]]
##         Date    p
## 6 2001-01-25  4.6
## 7 2001-01-26 13.0
## 8 2001-01-27 45.1
## 
## [[4]]
##          Date    p
## 14 2001-02-13  9.1
## 15 2001-02-14 23.0
## 16 2001-02-15  8.8
## 
share|improve this answer
    
That does duplicate the values where runs of more than three occur. –  BondedDust Mar 1 '13 at 3:41
    
@DWin true. it's just assumption on my part OP wanted that. Your solution is good too –  Chinmay Patil Mar 1 '13 at 3:46

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