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Consider the following piece of code:

#include <cstddef>

template<size_t value> class dummy { };

class my_class
{
    int m_member;

    // Overload 1
    template<size_t value>
    friend void friend_func(dummy<value>*);

    // Overload 2
    template<size_t value>
    friend void friend_func(int(*)[value]);
};

// Overload 1
template<size_t value>
void friend_func(dummy<value>*)
{
    my_class instance;
    instance.m_member = value;
}

// Overload 2
template<size_t value>
void friend_func(int(*)[value])
{
    my_class instance;
    instance.m_member = value;
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    dummy<5> d;
    friend_func(&d);    // call Overload 1
    int arr[5];
    friend_func(&arr);  // call Overload 2 - error in MSVC!
    return 0;
}

As you can see, the only difference between these two functions is that the second one takes a pointer to value ints instead of dummy<value>. This code compiles just fine in GCC ($ gcc-4.7.2 test.cpp) and Clang (thanks WhozCraig), but throws the following error in MSVC (I tested 2012):

1>d:\path\to.cpp(32): error C2248: 'my_class::m_member' : cannot access private member declared in class 'my_class'
1>          d:\path\to.cpp(8) : see declaration of 'my_class::m_member'
1>          d:\path\to.cpp(7) : see declaration of 'my_class'
1>          d:\path\to.cpp(40) : see reference to function template instantiation 'void friend_func<5>(int (*)[5])' being compiled

To me this looks like a bug. However, is there anyone who encountered such a behavior before? Is it really a bug, or maybe there's a particular reason for the error? Any quick workaround for this?


Edit: I've been able to find a proper workaround, see answer below.

share|improve this question
1  
It probably doesn't help that clang eats this right up with no problem. – WhozCraig Mar 1 '13 at 2:54
up vote 2 down vote accepted

It's definitely a bug: A template function parametrized on the size of an array cannot be declared as a friend of a class. It occurs when value is deduced as the size of the array for your friend template function. Here is a shortened version of your code that compiles fine. This example is the exact same code as your example except I specified the size of the array.

class my_class
{
    int m_member;

    template<size_t value>
    friend void friend_func(int(*)[5]);
};

template<size_t value>
void friend_func(int(*)[5])
{
    my_class instance;
    instance.m_member = value;
}

int main()
{
    int arr[5];
    friend_func<5>(&arr);
}

One workaround it to pass the value as a second function argument:

template <typename T>
void friend_func(T, int value)
{
    my_class instance;
    instance.m_member = value;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the link! Your solution works. However, using it I lose the strongly-sized array overload without explicitly specifying the (possibly incorrect) size. Even more important, the first piece of code you've posted produces ambiguity when there's an overload taking int*. I've managed to get a better workaround here. – a553 Mar 1 '13 at 5:16

Pretty sure it's a known issue with MSVS. Your specific issue is listed in the Portability Hints: Micrsoft Visual C++ on boost.org.

Look for Templates as Friends. I do not know the work around. However, I think you can make a class a friend. You may be able to use that as a work around.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, but that's not the case. The article you've mentioned is for MSVC 6; I'm using MSVC 11. The "Templates as Friends" bug is fixed long ago, the first overload function in my opening post would issue an error if it was not. – a553 Mar 1 '13 at 3:38
    
You are correct, sorry. I've got noth'n. – john.pavan Mar 1 '13 at 4:14

I've figured a workaround that preserves the functionality yet does its job of preventing the error message. The idea is to use a proxy function and a proxy class to carry the pointer to the array and it's size. Here's the solution:

#include <cstddef>

// Workaround class for a bug in MSVC.
// https://connect.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/feedback/details/717749
// http://stackoverflow.com/questions/15149607
template<class element_type, size_t count>
class friend_declaration_bug_workaround
{
public:
    typedef element_type(*ptr_type)[count];

private:
    ptr_type m_arr;

public:
    explicit friend_declaration_bug_workaround(ptr_type arr)
        : m_arr(arr)
    {
    }

    ptr_type value() const
    {
        return m_arr;
    }
};

class my_class
{
    int m_member;

    friend void friend_func(int*);

    template<size_t value>
    friend void friend_func_workaround(friend_declaration_bug_workaround<int, value>);
};

template<size_t value>
void friend_func_workaround(friend_declaration_bug_workaround<int, value> workaround)
{
    my_class instance;
    instance.m_member = (*workaround.value())[0];
}

void friend_func(int* arr)
{
    my_class instance;
    instance.m_member = *arr;
}

template<size_t value>
void friend_func(int(*arr)[value])
{
    friend_declaration_bug_workaround<int, value> workaround(arr);
    return friend_func_workaround(workaround);
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    int value;
    friend_func(&value);    // call non-templated function
    int arr[5];
    friend_func(&arr);      // call workarounded function
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Just a suggestion, but you could avoid all that work with std::vector or std::array (for example or here). – Jesse Good Mar 1 '13 at 8:32
    
@JesseGood Sure, but in my case the generic collection type (the one suitable to range-based for from C++11) was already handled by a different overload, and I needed plain C arrays. – a553 Mar 1 '13 at 9:41
    
I see, however C++11 range-based for can handle plain C arrays BTW. – Jesse Good Mar 1 '13 at 9:48

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