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Do you need to have a / at the end of an img tag? I saw an example on W3schools.com without a /:

<img src="smiley.gif" alt="Smiley face" height="42" width="42">

I know it isn't necessary to self-close the tag, at least in my browser, but should I do so?

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marked as duplicate by Juhana, Peter O., ldav1s, Zaheer Ahmed, duDE May 6 '13 at 5:58

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

10  
You should not use or link to w3schools. It's not a reliable source of information and we don't want to encourage its use. I recommend using the Mozilla Developer Network instead. –  John Conde Mar 1 '13 at 2:50
    
@John - funny thing: w3.org/html/wg/drafts/html/master/… uses the img tag without the closing / –  Pat May 10 '13 at 21:25
    
You should probably never self close tags of any kind, as that is excessively tricky. –  itcouldevenbeaboat Feb 5 at 16:19

5 Answers 5

up vote 22 down vote accepted

The / is only required for XHTML & XML.

If you're using a HTML5 doctype, then there's no need to terminate self-closing tags in this way.

This applies to <img src="img.png" />, <br />, <hr /> etc.

I.e. Just use <img src="img.png">, <br> and <hr>.

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It's only required for XHTML standards, as mentioned in other answers. HOWEVER, it also has another use.

Some code editors such as Notepad++ allow you to expand/collapse tags to make for faster viewing. But if you just put <img>, how is it supposed to know the difference between a tag that doesn't require an end tag, and one that uses the same tag name but does (ie. in XML)? This is especially true if you use custom tags.

Therefore, using /> explicitly tells the editor that it's self-closing, allowing it to continue working just fine and not having it warn you about a mismatched tag.

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5  
Per this question, stackoverflow.com/questions/3558119/…, I wouldn't advise just slapping /'s all over a HTML5 doctype'd page, just for the sake of it: "In HTML 5, <foo /> means <foo>. The slash is just syntactic sugar for people who are addicted to XML. The syntax is valid, but it is not a "self-closing tag". The distinction is important since (in the HTML syntax at least) <div /> means <div> in HTML 5 and not <div></div> as it does in XHTML." –  Danny Beckett Mar 1 '13 at 3:09

I think it would be better to close the img tag. Off the top of my head I can think of 2 reasons:

  1. It won't validate under xhtml, if you care about this sort of thing.

  2. Anything/anyone trying to programmatically work with it may get confused/run in to issues about unclosed tags. Who knows, this may include you in the future. :)

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2  
HTML is not XHTML, so I find #1 irrelevant. #2 might be an issue on non-HTML-aware editors, however. (Bigger issues with XHTML/HTML relate to empty tags and CDATA, so I just give up on these other ones: pick your battles) –  user166390 Mar 1 '13 at 3:01
    
I would not overplan to migrate to XHTML sometime in the future. If somebody is migrating they should be able to take care of this kind of thing... –  irregularexpressions Mar 1 '13 at 3:56
    
heh a little bit amusing now: there is another question I am looking at on this site asking how to parse html using actionscript 3. And the open img tag (and apparently other tags too) is raising an issue. –  mitim Mar 1 '13 at 10:08

The code is acceptable in html without using / but it is required in XHTML. I prefer to put / on so that there is no problem migrating from HTML to XHTML

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2  
Per this question, stackoverflow.com/questions/3558119/…, I wouldn't advise just slapping /'s all over a HTML5 doctype'd page, just for the sake of it: "In HTML 5, <foo /> means <foo>. The slash is just syntactic sugar for people who are addicted to XML. The syntax is valid, but it is not a "self-closing tag". The distinction is important since (in the HTML syntax at least) <div /> means <div> in HTML 5 and not <div></div> as it does in XHTML." –  Danny Beckett Mar 21 '13 at 15:10
    
I see.thanks for the info @Danny Beckett –  Snippet Mar 22 '13 at 2:21

Apart from the validity issue, which simply depends on the doctype you are validating against, the slash really matters only if your page is served with an XML content type, such as application/xhtml+xml (which is rarely used, because old versions of IE choke on it).

If you do that, then well-formedness error handling is Draconian: any error (such as a start tag without a matching end tag, which can be the start tag itself when the <img ... /> syntax is used) prevents the page from being displayed at all, and instead an error message is shown.

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