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(Python) I have 2 lists and want to merge them as follows.

a = [2,5,1]
b = [4,2,2]

Combine lists and the expected output should be: [2,5,1,4,2,2]

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For future reference, the term you're looking for is "concatenate", not "merge" –  mgilson Mar 1 '13 at 3:03
    
Assuming nneonneo helped you, you should upvote and check-mark him. –  xxmbabanexx Mar 1 '13 at 3:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Use +:

a + b

This will create a new list which is the concatenation of the two input lists.

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Occam's razor in effect. –  GordonsBeard Mar 1 '13 at 3:00
2  
It's times like these that I wish there wasn't a minimum character count :) –  nneonneo Mar 1 '13 at 3:01

There is also the extend function, this simply extends a with b:

a = [2,5,1]
b = [4,2,2]
a.extend(b)

To make a new list, eg: c one can do something like the following, even though nneonneo answer is simpler..:

def extendList(a, b):
    a.extend(b)
    return a

a = [2,5,1]
b = [4,2,2]
c = extendList(a, b)
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1  
(Note that extendList will mutate the first list that is passed in, and a is c afterwards). –  nneonneo Mar 1 '13 at 4:50
    
Nice catch. But I do not understand why a is c afterwards.. –  JHolta Mar 1 '13 at 5:27
    
a is c will be True after c = extendList(a, b). This means that alterations to a will affect c, and vice-versa, because they are the same list. This may be problematic in some cases, or beneficial in others. –  nneonneo Mar 1 '13 at 5:29
    
I understod that part. But i'm extending a with b in a private scope (within a function), so it should not be global, but for some reason (i do not understand) this does in fact alter a outside the function. –  JHolta Mar 1 '13 at 5:52

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