Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I've declared some simple boolean field in my model/user.rb

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
attr_accessible :name, :has_car

def  init(age)
 if age > 18
   has_car = true
 else
   has_car = false
 end
   has_car
end
...

Then in my view (.html.haml file), I tried to just print the field:

...
%li
 - if this_user.has_car
   = "This person has a car"
 - else
   = "This person does NOT have a car"
...

For some reason, this_user.has_car always evaluates to false. Could anyone tell me what I did wrong here? (I'm very new to Ruby/Rails)

Thanks

share|improve this question
1  
when you are calling init?? It doesn't call automatically.. u need to call it.. – codeit Mar 1 '13 at 3:27
    
Is it possible to assign a default value to has_car so that if init doesn't get called, has_car still has some value? – One Two Three Mar 1 '13 at 3:34
    
For some reason, this_user.has_car always evaluates to false : I think you have nil value for has_car. To initialize to true or false u need to call at some point like before_create or something. But I am not getting how you are passing age. – codeit Mar 1 '13 at 3:35
    
You can specify default value. – codeit Mar 1 '13 at 3:36
    
How can I do that? Just the same one way would in C? (ie., int x = 1;) ? – One Two Three Mar 1 '13 at 3:37

you can define a method called has_car? in the user model

# user.rb
def has_car?
  age > 18
end

then just use this_user.has_car? in your view.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 no need to fiddle with booleans if the statement you're checking already yields a boolean value. – Benjamin Udink ten Cate Mar 1 '13 at 4:48
# app/models/user.rb
class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  attr_accessible :name, :age, :has_car

  def initialize
    # Everyone does not have a car
    self.has_car = false
  end

  def has_car?
    self.has_car || self.age >= 18
  end

  def purchase_car
    self.has_car = true
  end

  def sell_car
    self.has_car = false
  end
end

The initialize method is used when you call user = User.new or user = User.create. This method simply sets has_car for that instance to false.

You can then ask user.has_car? which will return true if the user has a car (they've purchased one) or they are 18 or older.

Because 16 year olds (in some states) can buy cars, you can call user.purchase_car to specify that they now own a car. The has_car? method checks the has_car database column before checking their age.

The sell_car method does something similar, but it sets user.has_car to false.

Hope this helps, good luck in your Learn Ruby on Rails quest!

share|improve this answer

Shouldn't the method read like this?

def init(age)
  if age > 18
    has_car = true
  else
    has_car = false
  end
  return has_car
end
share|improve this answer
    
I have just tried that, still didn't work – One Two Three Mar 1 '13 at 3:23
    
Is age and integer and not a string or anything? – CD-RUM Mar 1 '13 at 3:23
    
yes, age is indeed integer. – One Two Three Mar 1 '13 at 3:24
    
in ruby, the last line is what's always returned so the original method is the same as your answer. – jvnill Mar 1 '13 at 4:02

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.