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Moving some code from Python to C++.

BASEPAIRS = { "T": "A", "A": "T", "G": "C", "C": "G" }

Thinking maps might be overkill? What would you use?

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4  
Why map might be overkill? –  ForEveR Mar 1 '13 at 5:57
    
What are you planning on doing with them? –  bchurchill Mar 1 '13 at 5:57
    
Can I define a map as a constant with the base values somehow in the class definiton? –  y2k Mar 1 '13 at 5:58
    
@WHOEVENCARES Why couldn't you? –  Rapptz Mar 1 '13 at 5:58
    
For that I'd use an IF ladder. –  Hot Licks Mar 1 '13 at 20:04

8 Answers 8

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you are into optimization, and assuming the input is always one of the four characters, the function below might be worth a try as a replacement for the map:

char map(const char in)
{ return ((in & 2) ? '\x8a' - in : '\x95' - in); }

It works based on the fact that you are dealing with two symmetric pairs. The conditional works to tell apart the A/T pair from the G/C one ('G' and 'C' happen to have the second-least-significant bit in common). The remaining arithmetics performs the symmetric mapping. It's based on the fact that a = (a + b) - b is true for any a,b.

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Really good thinking. –  y2k Mar 1 '13 at 6:50
    
@WHOEVENCARES I am not sure if it would be faster than the pure conditional Benjamin Lindley proposed. However, at least the subtraction part of my function could be performed in a vector register for several characters in parallel. –  jogojapan Mar 1 '13 at 6:55

While using a std::map is fine or using a 256-sized char table would be fine, you could save yourself an enormous amount of space agony by simply using an enum. If you have C++11 features, you can use enum class for strong-typing:

// First, we define base-pairs. Because regular enums
// Pollute the global namespace, I'm using "enum class". 
enum class BasePair {
    A,
    T,
    C,
    G
};

// Let's cut out the nonsense and make this easy:
// A is 0, T is 1, C is 2, G is 3.
// These are indices into our table
// Now, everything can be so much easier
BasePair Complimentary[4] = {
    T, // Compliment of A
    A, // Compliment of T
    G, // Compliment of C
    C, // Compliment of G
};

Usage becomes simple:

int main (int argc, char* argv[] ) {
    BasePair bp = BasePair::A;
    BasePair complimentbp = Complimentary[(int)bp];
}

If this is too much for you, you can define some helpers to get human-readable ASCII characters and also to get the base pair compliment so you're not doing (int) casts all the time:

BasePair Compliment ( BasePair bp ) {
    return Complimentary[(int)bp]; // Move the pain here
}

// Define a conversion table somewhere in your program
char BasePairToChar[4] = { 'A', 'T', 'C', 'G' };
char ToCharacter ( BasePair bp ) {
    return BasePairToChar[ (int)bp ];
}

It's clean, it's simple, and its efficient.

Now, suddenly, you don't have a 256 byte table. You're also not storing characters (1 byte each), and thus if you're writing this to a file, you can write 2 bits per Base pair instead of 1 byte (8 bits) per base pair. I had to work with Bioinformatics Files that stored data as 1 character each. The benefit is it was human-readable. The con is that what should have been a 250 MB file ended up taking 1 GB of space. Movement and storage and usage was a nightmare. Of coursse, 250 MB is being generous when accounting for even Worm DNA. No human is going to read through 1 GB worth of base pairs anyhow.

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But this still needs linear lookup time for char to base pair conversion –  perreal Mar 1 '13 at 6:31
    
@perreal If by "Linear Lookup Time" you mean O(1), then yes, this whole premise is O(1) and is also maximally compressed for very little effort. –  user1357649 Mar 1 '13 at 6:33
    
@perreal Could you please explain how this is linear time? Genuinely interested. –  Rapptz Mar 1 '13 at 6:33
3  
It's.... not doing that at all. I'm indexing into an array. It's all O(1). –  user1357649 Mar 1 '13 at 6:37
1  
@ThePhD, I fail to understand your char to pair conversion. –  perreal Mar 1 '13 at 6:39

You can use the following syntax:

std::map<char, char> my_map = {
    { 'A', '1' },
    { 'B', '2' },
    { 'C', '3' }
};
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4  
Only in C++11 though. –  congusbongus Mar 1 '13 at 6:31

Until I was really concerned about performance, I would use a function, that takes a base and returns its match:

char base_pair(char base)
{
    switch(base) {
        case 'T': return 'A';
        ... etc
        default: // handle error
    }
}

If I was concerned about performance, I would define a base as one fourth of a byte. 0 would represent A, 1 would represent G, 2 would represent C, and 3 would represent T. Then I would pack 4 bases into a byte, and to get their pairs, I would simply take the complement.

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A table out of char array:

char map[256] = { 0 };
map['T'] = 'A'; 
map['A'] = 'T';
map['C'] = 'G';
map['G'] = 'C';
/* .... */
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Not equal to python dict anyway... But, all depends on usage... –  ForEveR Mar 1 '13 at 5:59
    
That's a very strange map. –  Rapptz Mar 1 '13 at 6:00
1  
@ThePhD, incredibly? uses 256 bytes. What is the overhead of std::map? what is the lookup time? –  perreal Mar 1 '13 at 6:07
1  
You do realize this could be accomplished with a simple enumeration and a function? If you wanted to get slightly more fancy, you could use that enumeration into a table of other enums and use only 4 bytes. If you really wanted to grind some optomization gears, you'd pack ATCG into 2 bits (like what most sensible binary representations of DNA do). char is not a data type for DNA structures (there's a reason DNA-listing files are 4x bigger in ASCII). –  user1357649 Mar 1 '13 at 6:10
2  
@spin_eight, this is a direct access table, lookup is O(1) –  perreal Mar 1 '13 at 6:12

Here's the map solution:

#include <iostream>
#include <map>

typedef std::map<char, char> BasePairMap;

int main()
{
    BasePairMap m;
    m['A'] = 'T';
    m['T'] = 'A';
    m['C'] = 'G';
    m['G'] = 'C';

    std::cout << "A:" << m['A'] << std::endl;
    std::cout << "T:" << m['T'] << std::endl;
    std::cout << "C:" << m['C'] << std::endl;
    std::cout << "G:" << m['G'] << std::endl;

    return 0;
}
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2  
Unrelated but you are overflushing the stream. –  Rapptz Mar 1 '13 at 6:22

This is the fastest, simplest, smallest space solution I can think of. A good optimizing compiler will even remove the cost of accessing the pair and name arrays. This solution works equally well in C.

#include <iostream>

enum Base_enum { A, C, T, G };
typedef enum Base_enum Base;
static const Base pair[4] = { T, G, A, C };
static const char name[4] = { 'A', 'C', 'T', 'G' };
static const Base base[85] = 
  { -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1,
    -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1,
    -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1,
    -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, 
    -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1,
    -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1,
    -1, -1, -1, -1, -1,  A, -1,  C, -1, -1,
    -1,  G, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, -1, 
    -1, -1, -1, -1,  T };

const Base
base2 (const char b)
{
  switch (b)
    {
    case 'A': return A;
    case 'C': return C;
    case 'T': return T;
    case 'G': return G;
    default: abort ();
    }
}

int
main (int argc, char *args) 
{
  for (Base b = A; b <= G; b++)
    {
      std::cout << name[b] << ":" 
                << name[pair[b]] << std::endl;
    }
  for (Base b = A; b <= G; b++)
    {
      std::cout << name[base[name[b]]] << ":" 
                << name[pair[base[name[b]]]] << std::endl;
    }
  for (Base b = A; b <= G; b++)
    {
      std::cout << name[base2(name[b])] << ":" 
                << name[pair[base2(name[b])]] << std::endl;
    }
};

base[] is a fast ascii char to Base (i.e. int between 0 and 3 inclusive) lookup that is a bit ugly. A good optimizing compiler should be able to handle base2() but I'm not sure if any do.

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But this solution assumes the input comes as numbers 0, 1, 2, 3, rather than ASCII characters. You'd still have to perform a mapping of the input, correct? –  jogojapan Mar 1 '13 at 6:53
1  
Good point. I fixed it with the fastest mapping I could think of, and a prettier but possibly slower switch-based mapping. –  Kerri Chandler Mar 1 '13 at 7:32

BASEPAIRS = { "T": "A", "A": "T", "G": "C", "C": "G" } What would you use?

Maybe:

static const char basepairs[] = "ATAGCG";
// lookup:
if (const char* p = strchr(basepairs, c))
    // use p[1]

;-)

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