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Please have a look at the following code

int sum(int a, int b)
{
    int x = memberInstance.xyz(a); // memberInstance is an object of another class
    .....
    .....
}

Say, it is also known that xyz method returns numbers between 1-10. Now, I want to develop unit test method for sum method and I would like to replace the method call memberInstance.xyz(a) by arbitrary return value [ any value between 1-10]. Please let me know how can I achieve that? Please provide a sample code if possible.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You should use an interface to it.

public interface IMemberInstance
{
    int xyz {get;}
}

public class MemberInstance : IMemberInstance
{
 ... // the real class's implementation + code here
}

public class MockMemberInstance : IMemberInstance
{
   // the test class can return a test value
   int xyz(int a) { return 10; }
}

Then in your class to be tested (e.g. MyClass)

private IMemberInstance memberInstance;

public MyClass(IMemberInstance memberInstance)
{
    this.memberInstance = memberInstance;
}

int sum(int a, int b)
{
    int x = memberInstance.xyz(a); // memberInstance is an object of another class
    .....
    .....
}

Make it so that you can pass in an IMemberInstance to the class to be tested. This way you can fake it with a test class (Mock implementation)

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I already have developed many classes and instances of those classes are getting used in other classes. According to you solution I need to develop interfaces for all the classes and also have to change the code of the classes that are actually using the instance of other classes( need to have reference of the interface instead of using reference of actual class). Is there any other way to solve the problem? –  Anirban Paul Mar 1 '13 at 8:40
    
Not really... This is basically the way to do it. It is best to keep testing in mind as you develop so you do not need to go back and make modifications. Interfaces allow you to loosely couple the implementation of dependencies for objects so they can be easily tested. –  Alan Mar 1 '13 at 9:15
    
Got it. In future I shall try to develop keeping this factor in mind. But how to instantiate memberInstance in test method in case memberInstance is an private field of Container class? –  Anirban Paul Mar 1 '13 at 10:21
    
Usually, this is what Dependency Injection frameworks are all about (e.g. Unity, MEF, Spring, CastleWindsor). For it to be swappable with a test version, you must pass it to the containing class somehow. With dependency injection you declare the class as taking an interface to some dependency in the constructor. Then you register an implementation of that interface with a container. Then you ask the container for an instance of your Containing class and it automatically creates the dependencies and passes them into your containing class and returns to you the new instance. Google it –  Alan Mar 1 '13 at 14:45
    
If the member instance is entirely used by the container class to make it work, you may not need to declare any interface to it, etc. That is, if it is entirely an object needed by only the container class to function and doesn't represent some sort of outside functionality and therefore doesn't need tested separately –  Alan Mar 1 '13 at 14:48

You are looking for Mocking and one framework will work for you is "Mock You"

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