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I want to animate a div from right to left. Before that i have to append long dom in it. If i do both together animation is not smooth. See this Fiddle for live demo.

click "Click 1" - doing a smooth animation.
click "Reset".
click "Click 2" - bad animation.

-Any Help?

HTML:

<div>
    <div id="main-div" style="display: inline-block">
        <div id="div-1" class="inner-div">
        </div>
        <div id="div-2" class="inner-div" style="left: 300px; background-color: yellow">
        </div>
    </div>    
    <div style="display: inline-block; vertical-align: top">
        <input type="button" value='Call 1' onclick='DoAnimate(15)'/>
        <input type="button" value='Call 2' onclick='DoAnimate(4000)'/>        
        <input type="button" value='Reset' onclick='Reset()'/>
    </div>
</div>

JS:

function DoAnimate(count)
{
    $("#div-2").empty();

    for(var i = 0; i < count; i ++)
    {
        $("#div-2").append("<div> DIV " + i + "</div>");
    }

    $("#div-1").animate({left: -300}, 300);
    $("#div-2").animate({left: 0}, 300);
}

function Reset()
{
    $("#div-2").empty();

    $("#div-1").animate({left: 0}, 300);
    $("#div-2").animate({left: 300}, 300);
}

CSS:

#main-div
{
    position: relative;
    height: 400px;
    width: 300px;
    background-color: red;
    overflow: hidden;
}

.inner-div
{
    height: 400px;
    width: 300px;
    background-color: pink;
    position: absolute;
    top: 0px;
    left: 0px;
    overflow: auto;
}
share|improve this question
1  
You can improve the appending performance by using native DOM API (documentFragments where possible, and avoiding HTML parsing by the browser), but if you only want to wait for the reflow, simply query the object's computed style before requesting the animation. –  Jan Dvorak Mar 1 '13 at 6:35
1  
It takes a long time to append. You should definitely optimize that as well (if the scenario in the fiddle is realistic). –  Jan Dvorak Mar 1 '13 at 6:39

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Basically, what Jan said.

Append those newly constructed elements to a documentFragment or jQuery object instead of the DOM.

    ...
    $("#div-2").empty();
    var $wrapper = $('<div />');
    for(var i = 0; i < count; i ++) {
        $wrapper.append("<div> DIV " + i + "</div>");
    }
    $("#div-2").append($wrapper)    
    ...

http://jsfiddle.net/72CdX/

share|improve this answer
1  
The $wrapper approach is much faster than the direct approach but still too slow. Still a nice approach. –  Jan Dvorak Mar 1 '13 at 6:46
    
@JanDvorak can we attain more faster than this approach? –  user10 Mar 1 '13 at 6:51
    
@user10 documentFragments... but I don't have any experience using them. They're not supported by jQuery, so you'll have to delve into the realms of native DOM manipulation (which is always a good learning experience) –  Jan Dvorak Mar 1 '13 at 6:53
1  
Using the DOM API isn't much better... jsfiddle.net/fFGEN –  pdoherty926 Mar 1 '13 at 7:06
1  
I have to call it a night but, like this? jsfiddle.net/UkHkT –  pdoherty926 Mar 1 '13 at 7:09

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