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I am kind of shocked why the find method for C++ STL strings to find a sub-string is faster than a simple O(n) pass over the string. Here are two different functions: Why the second function which finds str1 in str2, is faster than the first function(which is well optimized)? I know that the first function does a slightly different task, but still it's just a pass over str1 and str2 (O(n)), while the second function may need O(n^2) to find str1 in str2. Really Why? Do you guys have any idea? Thank you in advance.

P.S The functions are parts of a bigger project. They are called so many times in my code to compare two strings. The running time for the whole code gets almost half (135 secs VS 235 secs) if I use the second function!

bool Is_Included1(string str1, string str2)
{
    size_t i,s;
    s=str1.size();
    if (s<=str2.size())
    {
        for (i=0;i<s;i++)
            if (str1[i]!=str2[i])
                return false;
        return true;
    }
    return false;
}


bool Is_Included2(string str1, string str2)
{
    size_t i;
    if (str1.size()<=str2.size())
    {
        i=str2.find(str1);
        if (i==0)
            return true;
        else
            return false;
    }
    return false;
}
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2  
"I know that the first function does a slightly different task" o.k.... –  gdoron Mar 1 '13 at 6:57
1  
The first function does a vastly different thing. That does not fit "slight" in any ways... The first one just checks if the first string is a prefix to the second one... –  ppeterka Mar 1 '13 at 9:13
    
I know it's different, but why when I use the first one, it is slower. This is my question. –  Hamed100101 Mar 1 '13 at 11:01
    
i confirm after test that STL if faster than handmade, somehow it is more normal that libraries heavily used are faster than homemade code. Answer is in STL code for sure... –  philippe lhardy Mar 1 '13 at 22:27
1  
fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/… (fr) Boyer Moore algorithm by example is in O(n+m) and not in O(n.m) ... –  philippe lhardy Mar 2 '13 at 8:51
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3 Answers

I've traced the implementation in GCC 4.7.2. Its complexity is O(nm), where n, m are the length of two strings.

Suppose n.size() is lesser than m.size(), for each possible starting point i of m, it first compare n[0] and m[i] (traits_type::eq), then call traits_type::compare, which actually performs __builtin_memcmp().

This is not the exact implementation but it illustrate the algorithm.

for (size_t i=0; i<m.size(); ++i) {
    if (traits_type::eq(n[0], m[i]) &&
        traits_type::compare(n[1], m[i+1], n.size()-1) == 0) {
            return i;
    }
}
return -1;

Though the time order of algorithm is worse, I guess it is because __builtin_memcmp() does not compare the character one by one and thus becomes faster then we expect.

By the way, if you call the function frequently you should pass const reference of two strings instead pass by value, which causes unnecessary copies.

As following:

bool Is_Included2(const string& str1, const string& str2)
{
    if (str1.size() > str2.size()) return false;
    return str2.find(str1) == 0;
}
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The reason must at least partially be the specific structure of your queries, and it is an interesting detective challenge to find out! For example Your implementation will obviously be faster when str2 is much longer than str1 (and does not contain totally different characters). To avoid confusions let's assume for now that both strings have the same length.

The probable explanation is that the your STL version implementation does batch-comparison of characters using the longer registers available on the CPU. You can pack several characters into a single register and them compare all in parallel. This way you can compare several consecutive characters at one step (even with standard 64-bit registers you can pack 8 characters and compare them at the same time). See This stack overflow question for a discussion.

Another possible explanation is that STL uses an algorithm that, say, starts comparing the strings from their ends, and the ends if your strings tend to differ more than the prefixes of the strings.

You can check by running a test: Is the speed difference due to matches, or non-matches, or both? For my second explanation you would see that the non-matches are better in the STL version, and the first explanation would give more speed to matches.

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The difference is array accessor [i] vs pointer arithmetic.

Using str1[i] and str2[i] is the main difference. These accessors typically do not optimize as well as using underlying pointer arithmetic, eg. const char* c1 = str1.cstr() and then doing ++c1; ++c2 to iterate across them (which is what any STL implementation does under-the-hood).

In general the underlying hardware does a better job iterating over pointers rather than arrays. On occasion a compiler can optimize a loop to use pointer arithmetic instead of array arithmetic, but since std::string uses a complex overloaded implementation of operator[], it basically always ends up up doing arrayBase+offset on each iteration through the loop.

Try this:

bool Is_Included1(string str1, string str2)
{
    size_t i,s;
    s=str1.size();
    if (s<=str2.size())
    {
        const char* c1 = str1.c_str();
        const char* c2 = str2.c_str();
        for (i=0;i<s;i++, c1++, c2++)
            if (*c1!=*c2)
                return false;
        return true;
    }
    return false;
}

See how that compares to the STL reference implementation.

(note that the STL version is likely still a little faster, because now you can optimize it further to remove the use of int i entirely)

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I would add a general advice: In C++, forget the array access ever existed! Iterators are both more efficient and more flexible, since they also work for other containers that don't have random access. Mostly applicable to C as well. –  Jan Hudec May 10 '13 at 13:14
    
Well, if the compiler can inline the operator[], it should be able to optimize it as well. But this has two prerequisites: that inlining is enabled and that asserts are turned off (check, check, check... yes, operator[] does contain assert). –  Jan Hudec May 10 '13 at 13:21
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