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I have a few requirements before implementing my next program - hopefully a programming language exists that can do the following:

  1. Given a class (or interface) C, the programming language allows the user access to a list of all classes which extend/implement C.
  2. The programming language allows the user to iterate through all the variables and methods of a class.
  3. The user is able to determine the number and types of arguments a function will take.

    eg. foo(int a, String b, int c) can be queried 
    to return 3 or [int, String, int]
    

Are these absurd requirements or does some language implement them as basic techniques of reflection?

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.NET (any language) meets the the requirements if you're happy to restrict the "all classes" to "all classes within a known set of assemblies". –  Jon Skeet Mar 1 '13 at 7:23
    
I'm sorry I don't quite understand what you mean by "known set of assemblies"? –  sdasdadas Mar 1 '13 at 7:25
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He means (for example) that if I inherit a class from C, compile it and keep the resultant binary (which, in the .net world, is known as an assembly) on a usb key in my pocket, then you can't use reflection on that. –  Spike Mar 1 '13 at 7:29
    
@sdasdadas: In .NET, code is built into assemblies. You can reflect over any valid assembly (that can be loaded by the runtime you're using) but it's not going to know about class that exist in assemblies you don't tell it about. The –  Jon Skeet Mar 1 '13 at 7:31
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Does the language need to be statically typed? Otherwise Python meets your requirements. –  valtron Mar 1 '13 at 7:36
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I know that you prefer a statically-typed language, but if you consider a dynamically-typed one Smalltalk may be a good fit, since everything is an object (classes and methods are no exception ot this rule) and thus everything can be manipulated (not only queried, but also changed). Going to your requirements:

Given a class (or interface) C, the programming language allows the user access to a list of all classes which extend/implement C.

In Smalltalk there is no built-in notion of interface (though I think that I've seen extensions that added support for it). However, you can:

  • Given a class, find it direct subclasses: Number subclasses answers {Fraction. Float. Integer}.
  • Or all the hierarchy under it: Number allSubclasses answers an OrderedCollection(Fraction Float Integer ScaledDecimal SmallInteger LargePositiveInteger LargeNegativeInteger)

You can also find all classes that implement a given selector (pop in this case):

SystemNavigation default allClassesImplementing: #pop answers {ContextPart. FileSystemGuide. LIFOQueue. Stack}

As you can see, defining an "Interface" object to query for classes that implement a set of methods is quite easy (just have a collection of method names and query for classes implementing each of them, adding the classes to a set). However if you want to explicitly state in the class that it implements an interface, then you'll need to do more work.

The programming language allows the user to iterate through all the variables and methods of a class.

Point instVarNames answers #('x' 'y')

Point allMethods answers a collection of CompiledMethods (the object that represents a method)

Point allSelectors answers a collection of all the method names that an instance of that class can answer to.

The user is able to determine the number and types of arguments a function will take.

In this case you interact with compiled methods and ask them for the number of arguments they need (there is no notion of parameter type):

(Point methodNamed: #x) numArgs answers 0, since it is just a getter.

(Point methodNamed: #+) numArgs answers 1

This is just a small preview of the reflective capabilities of Smalltalk; if you want to go deeper you can check out some of these links:

HTH

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Although I probably won't use Smalltalk, this was very interesting and thoroughly answered my question. –  sdasdadas Mar 1 '13 at 20:19
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I would expect most Lisp systems (Scheme, CommonLisp, ...) to meet these requirements.

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Java can do this. Yet, note that no language will do:

Given a class (or interface) C, the programming language allows the user access to a list of all classes which extend/implement C

The reason is that the number of classes that extend C is either zero (in case of final classes) or infinite. In the latter case, which is the norm, only a tiny portion of all classes that extend C has actually been written down and compiled, and only those you can access.

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"Yet, note that no language will do:", sorry but that's not exactly right (see my answer on Smalltalk). Since Smalltalk is a language and an environment you can query (and act upon) your entire system. –  Andrés Fortier Mar 1 '13 at 12:39
    
@AndrésFortier Did you not read my reasoning? It's simply impossible to allow the user access to an infinite number of not-yet written classes. –  Ingo Mar 1 '13 at 12:43
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I though that you meant the classes that weren't compiled/loaded yet in the system. If you are actually referring to classes whose code has not been written yet, then that simply adds no value to the OP question whatsoever; to solve that you would need clairvoyant programming language. What you can expect (and Smalltalk does) is to be able to add a new subclass and see that new subclass appear in a list without having to do anything fancy. That is how actually the Smalltalk IDE works and can be extrapolated to any program you write on it. –  Andrés Fortier Mar 1 '13 at 13:00
    
@Ingo Andres is correct - I have no illusion that I could iterate over all possible classes that extend another class. Only the compiled ones interest me. –  sdasdadas Mar 1 '13 at 20:16
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