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Learning about recursion and having trouble with the code posted below, in line 6,

int result=fact(n-1)*n;

When I delete "fact" the program acts like I think it would, printing out:

Factor of 3 6
Factor of 4 12
Factor of 5 20

but with the "fact" in it gives the output below? What is this line doing, and what is "fact" ? thanks everyone.

Factor of 3 6
Factor of 4 24
Factor of 5 120
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1  
why would you expect factorial of 4 to be 12?? you can see factorial of 3 is 6. if n is 4, then fact(n-1)*n is fact(3)*4 is 6*4 is 24. –  Kip Oct 4 '09 at 0:58
4  
<soapbox>Textbooks need to stop using such a contrived example as a way to teach recursion. Once a student sees the iterative solution, they come away thinking that recursion is useless.</soapbox> –  Barry Brown Oct 4 '09 at 1:08

4 Answers 4

Factorial is often used as an example of something which can be performed using recursion.

For example, factorial of 5 is calculated as follows:

5! = 5 * 4 * 3 * 2 * 1

Also, there is another way of thinking about it:

5! = 5 * 4!
4! = 4 * 3!
3! = 3 * 2!
2! = 2 * 1!
1! = 1

The way the second series of equalities are written, it can be seen that a factorial can be calculated in a recursive fashion. For example:

5! = 5 * 4! --> 5! = 5 * (4 * 3!) --> 5! = 5 * (4 * (3 * 2!)) --> and so on.

The fact function in the question is performing the factorial function as written in the second series of equalities:

fact(n) = n * fact(n-1);

So, when the fact method is being called, way it is being called can be thought as something like the following:

fact(5) --> fact(5 * fact(4)) --> fact(5 * fact(4 * fact(3))) --> and so on.

Also, it should be noted as Kip points out in the comments, calculating the factorial of a number can be much easily and quickly calculated by iterating over the range of numbers from n to 1 and multiplying it together to calculate the result.

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and also, it should be noted, of something that shouldn't be performed with recursion, since an iterative loop is so easy. –  Kip Oct 4 '09 at 0:53
    
Or a table lookup is so much more effective. No one in their right mind would use either iteration or recursion to calculate a factorial. The more efficient thing is either a table lookup or the gamma function. –  duffymo Oct 4 '09 at 2:16
    
@duffymo: especially for integers, even 64-bit integers overflow at 20! or something like that. a factorial function returning a double would probably overflow the range of doubles pretty quickly (factorial function grows really fast...) –  Kip Oct 4 '09 at 20:13

Apparently this is the classic example of recursion using the factorial calculation.

What you're calling fact(N) is usually denoted by N! (by mathematicians, anyway)

n! = n x (n-1) x (n-2) ...

so 5! = 5 x 4 x 2 x 1 = 120
4! = 4 x 3 x 2 x 1 = 24

Incidentally, this may be a little counterintuitive, but 0! is defined as 1

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fact(5) = fact(4) * 5
fact(4) = fact(3) * 4
fact(3) = fact(2) * 3
fact(2) = fact(1) * 2
fact(1) = 1

fact(5) = fact(4) * 5 = fact(3) * 4 * 5 = .. = 1 * 2 * 3 * 4 * 5 = 120

Function recuresively calls itself so it unwraps calculation to 1 * 2 * 3 * 4 * 5.

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When you remove the call to fact again you are just doing:

println(n * (n-1))

You may want to try doing a factorial with just a loop and see how different the code is.

Recursion can be useful, but, you will be limited in how large of (n) you can call, as you will eventually overflow the stack, since the calculations won't happen until you reach the condition that marks the end of the recursion.

To better understand recursion you can look at this link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recursion_(computer_science)

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