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I do something like this in my code

CmpExpr:
      rval '<<' rval           { $$ = $1 << $3; }
    | rval '>>' rval           { $$ = $1 >> $3; }
    | rval '>>>' rval          { $$ = (unsigned)($1) >> ($3); }
    ;

the warning i get is

tokens '>>>' and '>>' both assigned number 62

How do i make it use different tokens?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
%TOKEN LSHIFT RSHIFT RRSHIFT

in lex write

"<<"    	{ return LSHIFT; }
">>"    	{ return RSHIFT; }
">>>"   	{ return RRSHIFT; }

then you can write

CmpExpr:
      rval LSHIFT  rval           { $$ = $1 << $3; }
    | rval RSHIFT  rval           { $$ = $1 >> $3; }
    | rval RRSHIFT rval           { $$ = (unsigned)($1) >> ($3); }

I think you can write "<<" instead of LSHIFT since it compiles but i have no idea if it runs differently

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Yes, you can use "<<" in the grammar file, it's exactly the same. –  akim Mar 4 '13 at 12:44
    
Using "<<" generates a unique token for the shift, but it does not generate a definition for that token in the .tab.h file, so there's no easy way to produce that token in your lexer... –  Chris Dodd Mar 4 '13 at 17:08

You can only have a single character between the quotes in bison -- any multiple character token must be recognized by the lexer as such and returned as a single token, as described by acidzombie

When you put multiple characters in quotes in bison (as you have done), it essentially just ignores all except for the first, which means '>>' and '>>>' are really the same token (the same as '>'), giving the error you see. This is not terribly useful behavior, but was inherited from the original yacc program.

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I dont know if you notice i asked and answered this question ;) –  acidzombie24 Oct 6 '09 at 20:31

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