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I am reading Metaprogramming Ruby book, and there is method, which I cant understant:

def to_alphanumeric(s)
  s.gsub /[^\w\s]/, ''
end

I see there is Argument Variable (s), which is called lately and is converted to some weird expression? What exactly can I do with this method, is he useful?

Following method works just fine:

def to_alphanumeric(s)
  s.gsub %r([aeiou]), '<\1>'
end

p = to_alphanumeric("hello")
p p
>> "h<>ll<>"

But if I upgrade method to class, simply calling the method + argv to_alphanumeric, no longer work:

class String 
  def to_alphanumeric(s)
    s.gsub %r([aeiou]), '<\1>'
  end
end
p = to_alphanumeric("hello")
p p
undefined method `to_alphanumeric' for String:Class (NoMethodError)
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For the class version: class String ... end "hello".to_alphanumeric –  erdeszt Mar 1 '13 at 11:30

2 Answers 2

Would it hurt to check the documentation?

http://www.ruby-doc.org/core-2.0/String.html#method-i-gsub

Returns a copy of str with the all occurrences of pattern substituted for the second argument.

The /[^\w\s]/ pattern means "everything that is not a word or whitespace"

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Thank you, how do you exactly know what the given pattern means? Link to resource will be nice! –  Ivan Kutsarov Mar 1 '13 at 10:32
    
To call this method, just use something like to_alphanumeric(s) => hello –  Kleber S. Mar 1 '13 at 11:00
    
It's called regular expression en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regular_expression –  erdeszt Mar 1 '13 at 11:01
    
The Regexp class has a surprisingly large number of docs on it. But really, regular expressions are their own topic (Google should get you pretty far). –  Joshua Cheek Mar 1 '13 at 11:55

Take a look at Rubular, the regular expression /[^\w\s]/ matches special characters like ^, /, or $ which are neither word characters (\w) or whitespace (\s). Therefore the function removes special characters like ^, / or $.

>> "^/$%hel1241lo".gsub /[^\w\s]/, ''
=> "hel1241lo"

call it simple like a function:

>> to_alphanumeric("U.S.A!")
=> "USA"
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I will check it out. I slightly updated my question, check it out please! –  Ivan Kutsarov Mar 1 '13 at 11:02

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