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I have two classes that inherit from the same abstract class. I want both of them or at least one to be aware of changes in a specific property of the other. Is there any simple method for doing this? I've been trying to move the variable to the parent class, but that just creates 2 of the same variable, and when I create a reference to the other class inside the first one the same thing happens. thanks.

This is what my code looks like:

public abstract class Animal
    {
        public int MovementSpeed;
        public bool Death;
        public string Feedback;

        public bool DeerCaught;
        public int tiredRate;
        public virtual int Movement()
        {
            MovementSpeed = MovementSpeed - tiredRate;
            return MovementSpeed;
        }

        public virtual string Print()
        {
            return Feedback;
        }
    }

    public class Deer : Animal
    {
        public string hidden;
        public string Foraging;

        public int DeerCount;


        public Deer()
        {
            this.DeerCount = 10;
            this.DeerCaught = false;
            this.MovementSpeed = 10;
            this.tiredRate = 2;

        }
        public void Hide()
        {
            if (Hunting)
            {
                Feedback = "The deer is hiding.";
                if (DeerCount > 0)
                {
                    Print(); 
                }

            }
            else
            {
                //Forage();
            }
        }
        public void Forage()
        {
            if (!Hunting)
            {
                Feedback = "The deer is searching for food.";
                if (DeerCount > 0)
                {
                    Print();
                }

            }
            else
            {
                //Hide();
            }
        }
    }

    public class Wolf : Animal
    {

        public int Hunger;
        public bool Hunting;
        public Wolf()
        {
            this.Hunting = false;
            this.Hunger = 10;
            this.MovementSpeed = 10;
            this.tiredRate = 1;
        }
        public bool Hunt()
        {
            if (Hunger < 5)
            {
                Hunting = true;
                Feedback = "The wolf is searching for his next meal.";
                if (DeerCaught == true)
                {
                    Hunger++;
                }
                else
                {
                    Hunger--;
                }
                return Hunting;
            }
            else
            {
                Hunting = false;
                Feedback = "The wolf decides to rest.";
                Hunger--;
                return Hunting;
            }
        }
        public void Die()
        {
            if (Hunger < 0)
            {
                Death = true;
                Feedback = "The wolf has lost the hunt.";
            }

        }

    }

I've tried setting Hunting as static in the base class, but I just end up getting two different versions of 'Hunting' when I run the methods of each class.

share|improve this question
    
try partial classes –  DotNet Dreamer Mar 1 '13 at 10:32
    
Provide an event in each class and let the other class subscribe. –  bash.d Mar 1 '13 at 10:32
4  
im not sure what you are trying to do, showing some code might help –  x4rf41 Mar 1 '13 at 10:33
1  
If the property you are talking about is shared to all instances just define it as static in the abstract class. –  Stefano Altieri Mar 1 '13 at 10:33
    
I'm not sure what you're trying to do, but I think making your property/variable static might work. –  mdcuesta Mar 1 '13 at 10:34

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If this is intended as a simulation, then Deer isn't told when a wolf is hunting, it has to find out. The analogue here is to have some way that the Deer can query about the presence of wolves (something like Deer.LookForWolves(), then to check the value of the Hunting property on each wolf. This will require some sort of controller class, representing the world.

class World
{
    public static List<Animal> Animals = new List<Animal>();
    //...
}

class Deer : Animal
{
    //...

    bool IsSafe()
    {
        return LookForWolves().All(wolf => !wolf.Hunting);
    }

    List<Wolf> LookForWolves()
    {
        return World.Animals.OfType<Wolf>();
    }

    //...

Alternatively, you could reference World as a member of each Animal, passed in via the constructor. It's up to you, and will depend on whether you need to have multiple World objects, each with a different list of Animals.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 much better :) –  Daniel Hilgarth Mar 1 '13 at 11:15

Something like implementing INotifyPropertyChanged could help:

First, declare some classes that implement INotifyPropertyChanged:

abstract class Base {

}

class ClassA : Base, INotifyPropertyChanged {
    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

    private string _property;
    public string ClassAProperty {
        get {
            return _property;
        }
        set {
            _property = value;
            PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs("ClassAProperty"));
        }
    }
}

class ClassB : Base, INotifyPropertyChanged {
    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

    private string _property;
    public string ClassBProperty {
        get {
            return _property;
        }
        set {
            _property = value;
            PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs("ClassBProperty"));
        }
    }
}

Then, wire up new instances to subscribe to the PropertyChanged event:

using System.ComponentModel;

static void Main(string[] args) {
    ClassA a = new ClassA();
    a.PropertyChanged += PropertyChanged;
    a.ClassAProperty = "Default value";

    ClassB b = new ClassB();
    b.PropertyChanged += PropertyChanged;
    b.ClassBProperty = "Default value";

    b.ClassBProperty = "new value in B";
    a.ClassAProperty = "new value in A";

    Console.Read();
}

static void PropertyChanged(object sender, PropertyChangedEventArgs e) {
    Console.WriteLine("Property {0} on object {1} was changed, the value is \"{2}\"", e.PropertyName, sender.GetType().Name, sender.GetType().GetProperty(e.PropertyName).GetValue(sender));
}

Output of this is:

Property ClassAProperty on object ClassA was changed, the value is "Default value"
Property ClassBProperty on object ClassB was changed, the value is "Default value"
Property ClassBProperty on object ClassB was changed, the value is "new value in B"
Property ClassAProperty on object ClassA was changed, the value is "new value in A"

Each time either property is set, PropertyChanged is called, which in the above example writes the details to the console.

In your use case, you would have the event call a method in the other class (if I understand you correctly).

share|improve this answer
    
I haven't exactly learned how to use events yet. –  ZeroPhase Mar 1 '13 at 11:02
    
If this is not homework then I suggest you get familiar with them via my example. –  Simon Whitehead Mar 1 '13 at 11:09

The basic idea is to pass a reference of one object to the other. For example tell the deer it is being hunted by the wolf:

public class Wolf : Animal
{
    public void Hunt(Deer deer)
    {
        deer.SetHunter(this);
    }
}

Now the deer can check whether a wolf is hunting it:

public class Deer : Animal
{
    Wolf _hunter;
    public void SetHunter(Wolf wolf)
    {
        _hunter = wolf;
    }

    public void Hide()
    {
        if (_hunter != null)
        {
            Feedback = "The deer is hiding.";
        }
        else
        {
            //Forage();
        }
    }
}

This can be improved to be more generic, but it's the basic idea of passing a reference of one object to the other.

share|improve this answer

A very basic way to notify property changed with your own delegate definition. Since you do not provide any code I made up some classes myself. Use this as an example to modify your own code:

public delegate void PropertyChangedEventHandler();

public abstract class Base
{
}

public class A : Base
{
    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

    private int _value;
    public int Value
    {
        get { return _value; }
        set 
        { 
            _value = value;
            if (PropertyChanged != null)
            {
                PropertyChanged();
        }
    }
}

public class B : Base
{
    private A _a;

    public B(A a)
    {
        _a = a;
        a.PropertyChanged += new PropertyChangedEventHandler(a_PropertyChanged);
    }

    private void  a_PropertyChanged()
    {
        Console.WriteLine(_a.Value);
    }
}

public class Application()
{
    public void DoStuff()
    {
        var a = new A();
        var b = new B(a);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Don't use public fields for the properties of your classes. This way you will never be aware of changes and therefore can not notify others. Put the public fields into properties and always use these properties to change the value even from inside the Animal class. The property setter can then be used to notify others of changes.

public abstract class Animal
{
    private int _movementSpeed;

    public int MovementSpeed
    {
        get
        {
            return _movementSpeed;
        }
        set
        {
            if (_movementSpeed != value)
            {
                _movementSpeed = value;
                OnMovementSpeedChanged();
            }
        }
    }

    protected virtual void OnMovementSpeedChanged()
    {
        // Derived classes can override this method.
        // It will be called each time MovementSpeed changes.
    }

    public virtual int Movement()
    {
        // always use the property to change the value
        // otherwise OnMovementSpeedChanged would never be called
        MovementSpeed -= tiredRate;
        return MovementSpeed;
    }
}

Like others already mentioned you can also implement INotifyPropertyChanged in your base class. Since this uses events for notification not only derived classes can use that but also any other object that has a reference to an animal. The approach is basically the same. Each time the property value changes you call a method that fires the event. Any other object can then handle that event.

public abstract class Animal : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    private int _movementSpeed;

    public int MovementSpeed
    {
        get
        {
            return _movementSpeed;
        }
        set
        {
            if (_movementSpeed != value)
            {
                _movementSpeed = value;

                // call this method each time a property changes
                OnPropertyChanged(new PropertyChangedEventArgs("MovementSpeed"));
            }
        }
    }

    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

    protected virtual void OnPropertyChanged(PropertyChangedEventArgs args)
    {
        // always implement events like this
        // -> check if the event handler is not null, then fire it
        if (PropertyChanged != null)
        {
            PropertyChanged(this, args);
        }
    }
}

A class that wants to handle the event can do it like so:

public class AnyClass
{
    public AnyClass(Animal anAnimal)
    {
        TheAnimal = anAnimal;
        anAnimal += Animal_PropertyChanged;
    }

    public Animal TheAnimal { get; private set; }

    private void Animal_PropertyChanged(object sender, PropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        if (e.PropertyName == "MovementSpeed")
        {
            Console.WriteLine("MovementSpeed changed"); 
        }
    }
}

Derived classes however don't need to handle the event. Since the OnPropertyChanged method is declared as protected virtual they can just override it.

public class Deer : Animal
{
    protected override void OnPropertyChanged(PropertyChangedEventArgs args)
    {
        if (args.PropertyName == "MovementSpeed")
        {
            Console.WriteLine("MovementSpeed changed");
        }

        // don't forget to call the base class otherwise the event will never get fired
        base.OnPropertyChanged(args);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

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