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I'm learning python out of "core python programming 2nd edition"

Im stuck at the part "How to Create Class instances". Page 84.

The example is as follows:

classes.py:

class FooClass(object):

    """my very first class: FooClass"""

    version = 0.1 # class (data) attribute



def __init__(self, nm='John Doe'):

    """constructor"""

    self.name = nm # class instance (data) attribute

    print'Created a class instance for', nm



def showname(self):

    """display instance attribute and class name"""

    print 'Your name is', self.name

    print 'My name is', self.__class__.__name__



def showver(self):

    """display class(static) attribute"""

    print self.version # references FooClass.version



def addMe2Me(self, x): # does not use 'self'

    """apply + operation to argument"""

    return x + x

Then i have to create Class Instances:

in my interpreter i do the follow:

Import classes *
fool = FooClass()

But nothing happends. It should print the init.

also when i use

fool.showname() and fool.showver it doesn't print any. It says

FooClass' object has no attribute 'showver

i really want to know what going on here, before i proceed. Hopefully someone can help me out!

Thanks in advance! :)

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Are you entering import with capital I or lower case i? –  limelights Mar 1 '13 at 11:41
1  
Is that how your code is indented in the file? I.e. the def lines are at the same level as the class? If so, they don't belong to the class and are functions, not methods. –  DSM Mar 1 '13 at 11:42
    
Are the functions actually in the class definition or are they separate? –  Volatility Mar 1 '13 at 11:42
    
@limelights im entering import with lowercase i. DSM: Yes, that's how it indented in the book aswell. Changed it right now, that the methods are tabbed under class Volatility: not 100% sure what you mean. I'm fairly new to all this :P –  SupSon ツ Mar 1 '13 at 11:45
2  
+1 on the question. A good example, how SO if for all programmers that have shown effort and ask questions in a proper way. –  DJV Mar 1 '13 at 11:47
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It looks like you haven't indented the methods of your class. With the following code:

class FooClass(object):
    ...

def __init__(self, nm='John Doe'):
    ...

You are declaring a class called FooClass and a function called __init__. The class will have a default empty constructor. If you instead indent it as:

class FooClass(object):
    ...
    def __init__(self, nm='John Doe'):
        ...

You have a class FooClass with the __init__ method as a constructor.

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Thx! it's working now! Not only the indents were wrong. I also left space between all Methods. Thx for the help! :) –  SupSon ツ Mar 1 '13 at 11:57
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Well, i am also learning python and i am also referring this book but my book is 1st edition. But, what i analyzed from your code is that it is not indented properly.Please check properly and hope so it will work fine.Thanks.

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You appear to have indentation problems. Much like the code in functions, conditionals and loops has to be indented for Python to treat it as "inside" them, your various class methods need to be indented past the class ...: line to be part of the class rather than merely (separate) functions that happen to be defined after it. So,

class FooClass(object):

    """my very first class: FooClass"""

    version = 0.1 # class (data) attribute



    def __init__(self, nm='John Doe'):

        """constructor"""

        self.name = nm # class instance (data) attribute

        print'Created a class instance for', nm

and so on for the rest of your methods.

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Got it to work! thxx :D –  SupSon ツ Mar 1 '13 at 11:59
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