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I am wondering the best format to lay out my data in a mySQL table so that it can be queried in the fastest manner to gather an array of daily values to be further utilized by php.

So far, I have laid out the table as such:

item_id    price_date     price_amount
      1    2000-03-01             22.4
      2    2000-03-01            19.23
      3    2000-03-01             13.4
      4    2000-03-01            14.95
      1    2000-03-02             22.5
      2    2000-03-02            19.42
      3    2000-03-02             13.4
      4    2000-03-02            13.95

with item_id defined as an index.

Also, I am using:

"SELECT DISTINCT price_date FROM table_name" 

to get an array containing a unique list of dates.

Furthermore, the part of the code that is within a loop (and the focus of my optimization question) is currently written as:

"SELECT price_amount FROM table_name WHERE item_id = 1 ORDER BY price_date"

This second "SELECT" statement is actually within a loop where I am selecting/storing-in-array the daily prices of each item_id requested.

All is currently functioning and pulling the data from mySQL properly, however, both the above listed "SELECT" statements are taking approx 4-5 seconds to complete per each run, and when looping through 100+ products to create a summary, adds up to a very inefficient/slow information system.

Is there any more-efficient way that I could structure the mySQL table and/or SELECT statements to retrieve the results faster? Perhaps defining a different index on a different column? I have used the EXPLAIN command to return information per the queries but am unsure how to use the EXPLAIN information to increase the efficiency of my queries.

Thanks in advance for any mySQL wizards that may be able to assist.

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You should create an index covering both the item_id and price_date column: CREATE INDEX t_idx ON table_name (item_id, price_date); –  Groo Mar 1 '13 at 11:57
    
@Groo, could you provide a bit more information as to how I would go about doing so? Or a link to an article that explains how to use indexes properly in mySQL to optimize queries? I apologize for my unfamiliarity with the proper method/setting for indexes, I have not needed to worry about speed issues prior to this as the data sets returned were very minimal in scope. –  IIIOXIII Mar 1 '13 at 12:02
    
Well, a general (simplified) rule is to create an index covering all columns specified in your WHERE clause. Without index, db engine needs to scan all rows to find ones matching the criteria (an O(n) operation). With an index, usually implemented as a B-tree, engine can seek into the index (an O(logn) operation), and then immediatelly jump to rows covered by the query. Negative side is that each index increases the size of the database, and slows down operations which modify the database (INSERT, UPDATE), because they require the index to be updated each time. –  Groo Mar 1 '13 at 12:42

2 Answers 2

Single column index

I am using:

  "SELECT DISTINCT price_date FROM table_name" 

to get an array containing a unique list of dates.

This query can be executed more efficiently if you create an index for the price_date column:

ALTER TABLE table_name ADD INDEX price_idx (price_date);

Mutiple column index

Furthermore, the part of the code that is within a loop (and the focus of my optimization question) is currently written as:

  "SELECT price_amount FROM table_name WHERE item_id = 1 ORDER BY price_date"

For the second query, you should create an index covering both the item_id and price_date column:

 ALTER TABLE table_name ADD INDEX item_price_idx (item_id, price_date);
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When I run either command through phpmyadmin i get an error near 'ON table_name (price_date) for the 1st and 'ON table_name (item_id, price_date); for the 2nd - any input? Thanks for the help so far. –  IIIOXIII Mar 1 '13 at 12:17
    
Still stuck on the sql syntax error mentioned above. Not sure what the problem is. –  IIIOXIII Mar 1 '13 at 12:35
    
@IIIOXIII: oops, sorry, I started typing CREATE INDEX xxx ON TABLE ttt, and then changed to the ALTER TABLE syntax in order to set the index on an existing table. In this latter case table name should not be specified twice. –  Groo Mar 1 '13 at 12:36
    
Thanks Groo. The second query did not seem to get any faster with the index defined on item_id/price_date. Timestamp prior to query and after is approx 4-5 seconds to complete. Have not tried the adding the first index yet. Any other suggestions? Also, am I correct that I need to specify a different name for each index? I.e. the first and second indexes cannot both be named t_ndx, correct? –  IIIOXIII Mar 1 '13 at 12:42
    
@IIIOXIII: Yeah, you're right, I modified their names to be unique. Well, if that's the query you're using, then this is the covering index which should be chosen by the engine. How large is the db, and how many results do your test queries return? You can also add the EXPLAIN keyword before SELECT to see what it does, but it's a rather simple one. –  Groo Mar 1 '13 at 12:55

I know this is a bit late, but i stumbled across this and thought I would throw my thoughts into the mix.

Indexes used well are very helpful in speeding up queries (Explain shows some really godd results around which indexes are being chosen - if any - for a specific query). However efficient PHP will help even more.

In your case you do not show the PHP, but it looks like you offer a list of dates and then loop through finding all the items in that date to get the prices. It would be more efficient to do something like the following:

Select item_id, price_amount from table_name where price_date= order by item_id, price_amount

with an index (preferably a Unique Index) on price_date,item_id,price_amount

You then have a single loop through the resultant SQL not a loop with multiple SQL connections (this is especially true if your SQL server is separate from the PHP box as an external network connection can have an overhead).

4-5 seconds for a single query though is very slow )by a factor of at least 100x) so it would indicate a problem (very large table with no key to use) or disk issues (potentially).

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