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My program always used the platform-dependent synchronous receive, which blocked the execution until timeout or receive event, something like:

recv(buf, size, timeout);

Now I want to replace this code with boost to make it cross-platform. I found the solution, but it is quite ugly I think (in comparison with single function call). I wrote this:

void IPV4_HOST::recv_timer_handler(const boost::system::error_code & e)
{
    if (e.value() == boost::system::errc::success) {
        f_recv_timeout = true;
        asio_socket.cancel();
    }
}

void IPV4_HOST::recv_handler(const boost::system::error_code & , size_t bytes)
{
    recv_timer.cancel();
    bytes_received = bytes;
}

int IPV4_HOST::receive(void * buf, size_t buf_size, TIME::INTERVAL timeout)
{
    f_recv_timeout = false;
    bytes_received = 0;

    recv_timer.expires_from_now(timeout.get_boost_milli());
    recv_timer.async_wait(boost::bind(&IPV4_HOST::recv_timer_handler, this, boost::asio::placeholders::error));

    asio_socket.async_read_some(boost::asio::buffer(buf, buf_size),
                                boost::bind(&IPV4_HOST::recv_handler, this, boost::asio::placeholders::error, boost::asio::placeholders::bytes_transferred));

    io_service.run();

    if (f_recv_timeout)
        throw IO::TimeoutReceiveException();

    return bytes_received;
}

Could you please advise, am I doing it right or not? Is there simpler way to do this?

share|improve this question
1  
See the following answer by the library author: boost.2283326.n4.nabble.com/… –  Igor R. Mar 1 '13 at 13:01
    
This is almost equal to what i did, but thanks anyway –  Alex Petrenko Mar 1 '13 at 13:51

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It is in the right direction, but there are some subtle points to consider:

  • If any other work is posted into io_service, then IPV4_HOST::receive() will start processing that work.
  • When io_service::run() returns under normal conditions, it is implied that the io_service has been stopped. Subsequent calls to run(), run_one(), poll() or, poll_one() will return immediately unless the io_service is reset().
  • It is possible for both asynchronous operations to complete at the same time, making both completion handlers ready to run with success. This behavior is accentuated in the remarks section of deadline_timer::cancel(); however, all asynchronous operations exhibit this behavior. In the existing code, this can result in IO::TimeoutReceiveException being thrown when bytes_received is greater than zero.

One solution to handle the io_service details, as well as the non-deterministic order of execution with the completion handlers, may look something like:

void IPV4_HOST::recv_timer_handler(const boost::system::error_code & e)
{
  timer_handled = true;
  if (!e) {
    f_recv_timeout = true;
    asio_socket.cancel();
  }
}

void IPV4_HOST::recv_handler(const boost::system::error_code &,
                             size_t bytes)
{
  recv_handled = true;
  recv_timer.cancel();
  bytes_received = bytes;
}

int IPV4_HOST::receive(void * buf, size_t buf_size, TIME::INTERVAL timeout)
{
  timer_handled  = false;
  recv_handled   = false;
  f_recv_timeout = false;
  bytes_received = 0;

  recv_timer.expires_from_now(timeout.get_boost_milli());
  recv_timer.async_wait(
    boost::bind(&IPV4_HOST::recv_timer_handler, this,
                boost::asio::placeholders::error));

  asio_socket.async_read_some(
    boost::asio::buffer(buf, buf_size),
    boost::bind(&IPV4_HOST::recv_handler, this, 
                boost::asio::placeholders::error,
                boost::asio::placeholders::bytes_transferred));

  // If a handler has not ran, then keep processing work on the io_service.
  // We need to consume both handlers so that old handlers are not in the
  // io_service the next time receive is called.
  while (!timer_handled || !recv_handled)
  {
    io_service.run_one();
  }

  // If the io_service has stopped (due to running out of work), then reset
  // it so that it can be run on next call to receive.
  if (io_service.stopped())
    io_service.reset();

  // If no bytes were received and the timeout occurred, then throw.  This
  // handles the case where both a timeout and receive occurred at the 
  // same time.
  if (!bytes_received && f_recv_timeout)
    throw IO::TimeoutReceiveException();

  return bytes_received;
}

Also, as you are trying to obtain cross-platform behavior, read the remarks of basic_stream_socket::cancel(). There are some platform specific behaviors of which to be aware.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for that answer, I tested code with your corrections and now it works really stable. The only thing I did not get is why should we check io_service.stopped() before doing reset? Why cannot we just call reset every time? Is it for case if we use io_service somewhere else for other handlers? –  Alex Petrenko Mar 1 '13 at 14:44
1  
Correct. reset() cannot safely be called if there are any unfinished calls to the run(), run_one(), poll(), or poll_one() functions. I was unsure as to whether or not io_service was being used for other handlers, so opted for the safer solution. –  Tanner Sansbury Mar 1 '13 at 15:47

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