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For the example file contents below

00000001.00000001
00000001.00000002
00000001.00000003
00000001.00000004
00000001.00000006
00000001.00000010
00000002.00000001
00000002.00000002
00000002.00000003
00000002.00000004
0000000b.00000001

Need to find the out of order data. Out of order meaning here is after 00000001.00000004 next should come is 00000001.00000005 not 00000001.00000006 as in the above. 00000001.00000010 is also a wrong entry as after 00000001.00000006 next 00000001.00000007 should come.

Using awk can we print odd likes 00000001.00000006 and 00000001.00000010 from the above file.

Note that all are considered here as numbers which will be in hexadecimals. EG 0000001a.0000000b are hexadecimal numbers means 8digithexadecimal.8digithexadecimal.

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how about 00000002.00000001, out of order too? pre one is 00000001.00000010 or only the last digit(s) are significant ? –  Kent Mar 1 '13 at 13:01
    
no 00000002.00000001 is not considered here as out of order as its first value is 00000002 not 00000001. –  Omprakash Mar 1 '13 at 13:03
    
also 10 duplicated lines like 001.001, all 10 lines are in order? –  Kent Mar 1 '13 at 13:06
    
awk -F"." '{ a=$1;b=$2; getline; c=$1;d=$2; if (c==a && d!=(b++)) print;}' file above is not working –  Omprakash Mar 1 '13 at 13:15
    
there are so far two answers below, try them. –  Kent Mar 1 '13 at 13:17

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here's one way using awk:

awk -F. 'NR > 1 && $1==a && $2 + 0 != b + 1; { a=$1; b=$2 + 0 }' file

Results:

00000001.00000006
00000001.00000010

EDIT1:

awk -F. 'NR > 1 && strtonum("0x" $1) == a && strtonum("0x" $2) != b + 1; { a=strtonum("0x" $1); b=strtonum("0x" $2) }' file

Results:

00000001.00000006
00000001.00000010

EDIT2:

String comparison:

awk -F. '$1 != x; { x = $1 }' file 

Hex comparison:

awk -F. 'strtonum("0x" $1) != x; { x = strtonum("0x" $1) }' file

Results:

00000001.00000001
00000002.00000001
0000000b.00000001
share|improve this answer
    
This also works. –  Omprakash Mar 1 '13 at 13:38
    
Oops above not working. Note that all are considered here as numbers which will be in hexadecimals. EG a.b so a and b are hexadecimal numbers –  Omprakash Mar 4 '13 at 9:39
    
@Omprakash: You'll need GNU awk to handle your hex. See the strtonum() function here. I'll update my answer in a minute. HTH. –  Steve Mar 4 '13 at 11:10
    
Thanks it works. But in m/c where I have older awk version getting the error. awk: calling undefined function strtonum input record number 1, file sortfile source line number 1 Can it be possible without using strtonum we can do it? –  Omprakash Mar 5 '13 at 6:00
    
@Omprakash: Yes, you will need gawk on that box. Otherwise you'll need to write your own function to emulate strtonum() if you want to use awk. But it's probably easier to just install gawk. Goodluck. –  Steve Mar 5 '13 at 6:26

I hope I understand your question right.

You could try this one liner:

awk -F. 'NR>1 && $1-a==0 && $2-b!=1{print}{a=$1;b=$2}' file

given your example data, this short line outputs:

00000001.00000006
00000001.00000010

You could test with your real data, and report the result. I hope it is what you are looking for.

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This would render false negatives in case there are more first fields that end with a different letter after a previous line with another letter instead of a number (because $1-a==0 would then hold true.. ) –  Scrutinizer Mar 1 '13 at 14:01
    
Oops not workign with real data –  Omprakash Mar 1 '13 at 14:11
    
Note that all are considered here as numbers which will be in hexadecimals. EG a.b so a and b are hexadecimal numbers –  Omprakash Mar 1 '13 at 14:13
    
and both will always be of 8 digts. –  Omprakash Mar 1 '13 at 14:15
awk '{print (NR>1&&!(($1-a)=="1e-08"||($1-a)=="1"))?$1" < OutOfOrder":$1;a=$1}'
00000001.00000001
00000001.00000002
00000001.00000003
00000001.00000004
00000001.00000006 < OutOfOrder
00000001.00000010 < OutOfOrder
00000002.00000001
00000002.00000002
00000002.00000003
00000002.00000004
0000000b.00000001 < OutOfOrder
share|improve this answer
    
This is not out of order this is the start of next seq –  Omprakash Mar 1 '13 at 13:36
    
00000002.00000005 to 00000002.00000010 are missing so 0000000b.00000001 is out of order? –  iiSeymour Mar 1 '13 at 13:43
    
Sorry I think I am not clearly said the question. Let say a.1 then a.2 then a.5 that means a.5 is out of order. here comparision is relative to previous values and a. OR say a.b the b should be ordered relative to a. –  Omprakash Mar 1 '13 at 14:09

One more:

awk -F. 'p!=$1{p=$1; v=$2; next} v+1!=v=$2' file
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