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I know this might be strange but I have a timer and I have an event handler for Elapsed event that writes on Console, but when I start the application, the timer start properly, the event fire properly, too. However, the result doesn't show in console except after I press a button, which made me put two Console.ReadKey() so the application won't terminate.

Here is the code in Program.cs:

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Timer timer = new Timer(100);
        timer.Elapsed += new ElapsedEventHandler(WriteOnConsole);
        timer.Start();
        Console.ReadKey();
        Console.ReadKey();
    }

    static void WriteOnConsole(object source, ElapsedEventArgs e)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("A B C D");
    }

Please inform me if I haven't mentioned enough information.

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1  
What is the type of your timer? Which timer class (System.Timers, System.Threading....etc.)? –  ken2k Mar 1 '13 at 12:53
    
So, what is your question? –  bash.d Mar 1 '13 at 12:54
    
What exactly are you trying to achieve? –  John Willemse Mar 1 '13 at 12:55
    
@ken2k, I think its System.Timers.Timer from the event and constructor –  Habib Mar 1 '13 at 12:57
    
possible duplicate of Strange behaviour of Console.ReadKey() with multithreading –  Jon Skeet Mar 1 '13 at 12:59

3 Answers 3

The ReadKey() blocks the WriteLine(). After you pressed one key, the first ReadKey is finished and the pending writes to the console are flushed.

As this obviously only is a small sample to demonstrate the problem it is hard to suggest a better alternative.

One could be to use some sort of wait handle to exit the application only when a certain condition is met.

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But only the first one. And only if you haven't already written to it. I think there's something weird in the way the console is initialized, basically. –  Jon Skeet Mar 1 '13 at 12:56
    
It will work with ReadLine() instead of ReadKey() –  Eivind T Mar 1 '13 at 12:57
1  
@JonSkeet: Which "first one" do you mean? The first ReadKey or the first WriteLine? –  Daniel Hilgarth Mar 1 '13 at 12:57
    
Coincidentally, I think this has the same cause as the thing I asked about yesterday: stackoverflow.com/questions/15143931/… –  Matthew Watson Mar 1 '13 at 12:57
    
@DanielHilgarth: The first ReadKey. Note how the second ReadKey call doesn't block anything. –  Jon Skeet Mar 1 '13 at 12:58

I've seen this in another question - you don't even need a timer, just any two threads where one thread is reading from the console and another is writing.

It looks like the initialization for Console is somewhat broken - the first call to it will effectively take out a lock until it completes, preventing any other console access.

If you write:

Console.WriteLine("Starting");

at the start of your code, all will be fine, for example. It's not like ReadKey (or any other read operation) blocks all console output in general - it's just in the first call.

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1  
I can't reproduce: the OP's code works fine on my machine (edit: I mean it outputs directly to the console without the need to press a key) –  ken2k Mar 1 '13 at 13:00
1  
This is a race condition, and it seems to only occur on some systems. –  Matthew Watson Mar 1 '13 at 13:04

Try writing an empty string from the 1st thread, before anything else, thus initializing the Console:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    Console.Write(string.Empty);
    Timer timer = new Timer(100);
    timer.Elapsed += new ElapsedEventHandler(WriteOnConsole);
    timer.Start();
    Console.ReadKey();
    Console.ReadKey();
}

static void WriteOnConsole(object source, ElapsedEventArgs e)
{
    Console.WriteLine("A B C D");
}
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