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Why does this code:

class X {
public:
    X& operator=(int p) {
        return *this;
    }
    X& operator+(int p) {
        return *this;
    }
};

class Y : public X { };

int main() {
    X x;
    Y y;
    x + 2;
    y + 3;
    x = 2;
    y = 3;
}

Give the error:

prog.cpp: In function ‘int main()’:
prog.cpp:14:9: error: no match for ‘operator=’ in ‘y = 3’
prog.cpp:14:9: note: candidates are:
prog.cpp:8:7: note: Y& Y::operator=(const Y&)
prog.cpp:8:7: note:   no known conversion for argument 1 from ‘int’ to ‘const Y&’
prog.cpp:8:7: note: Y& Y::operator=(Y&&)
prog.cpp:8:7: note:   no known conversion for argument 1 from ‘int’ to ‘Y&&’

Why is the + operator inherited, but the = operator not?

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marked as duplicate by Frédéric Hamidi, Andy Prowl, us2012, juanchopanza, ecatmur Mar 1 '13 at 13:38

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
The answer to your question is here –  Andy Prowl Mar 1 '13 at 13:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Class Y contains implicitly-declared assignment operators, which hide the operator declared in the base class. In general, declaring a function in a derived class hides any function with the same name declared in a base class.

If you want to make both available in Y, use a using-declaration:

class Y : public X {
public:
    using X::operator=;
};
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You are forgetting the methods that the compiler automatically generates if they are not declared. Assignment is amongst them.

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Why does automatic generation delete my definition, when they have different signatures? –  Eric Mar 1 '13 at 13:38
    
@Eric: It doesn't delete it, it hides it. –  Andy Prowl Mar 1 '13 at 13:38
    
@AndyProwl: Same question then: why does it hide it, when the signatures don't conflict? –  Eric Mar 1 '13 at 13:39
2  
@Eric: Because any function declared in a derived class hides any function with the same name (not signature) declared in a base class. –  Mike Seymour Mar 1 '13 at 13:40
    
@Eric hiding does not require signatures to match. It works at the level of names. –  juanchopanza Mar 1 '13 at 13:41

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