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How to generate all permutations of set consisting from k 0's and l 1's in lexicographical order ? I'm looking for pseudocode or C++ code. Example :

000111
001011
001101
001110
010011
010101
010110
011001
011010
011100
100011
100101
100110
101001
101010
101100
110001
110010
110100
111000

function next_perm01 should operate like this : next_perm01(permutation_{i})=next_perm01(permutation_{i-1}) I've found only method for generating all permutations of set of different elements.

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5 Answers 5

Start with the lowest number that has l 1's in it: (1 << l) - 1

Then apply NextBitPermutation until you reach the highest number, which is lowest << k.

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Start with a permutation of k 0s followed by l 1s. Repeat this step while you can:

Find the rightmost stretch of q 1s (q > 0) preceded by a 0 and followed by r 0s (r >= 0). Replace it all by 1 followed by (r+1) 0s followed by (q-1) 1s. That will be your next permutation.

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Generating All Permutations by D.E.Knuth

See Algorithm L (lexicographic permutation generation) on the beginning of the first chapter

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If I understand correctly, then the general algorithm for a string could be:

nextPermutation string =
scan string from right to left
replace first occurrence of "01" with "10"
move all "1"'s that are on the right of the "01" to the string end*
return replaced string

*Thanks to n.m. for pointing out my mistake.

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How do you get 1001 from 0011? –  n.m. Mar 2 '13 at 8:41
    
@n.m. my algorithm would go from 0011 to 0101. why would you want to go to 1001 from 0011 ? –  גלעד ברקן Mar 2 '13 at 14:36
    
I don't want it to go directly from 0011 to 1001, I want it to go there eventually. Will it ever? –  n.m. Mar 2 '13 at 14:46
    
@n.m. 0011 0101 0110 1010 1100 would be my algorithm. Did I misunderstand the lexicographical question? –  גלעד ברקן Mar 2 '13 at 15:04
    
It does not generate all the sequences. 1001 is missing. The task was to generate all the sequences in lexicographical order, not some of them. –  n.m. Mar 2 '13 at 15:07

This is in Java, but you can consider this as pseudo-code:

public static boolean nextPermutation (int [] permutation)
{
    int l = permutation.length;
    if (l < 2) return false;
    else
    {
        int i = l - 1;
        while (i >= 0 && permutation [i] == 0)
            i--;

        int j = 0;
        while (i >= 0 && permutation [i] == 1)
        {
            i--;
            j++;
        }

        if (i < 0) return false;
        else
        {
            permutation [i] = 1;

            Arrays.fill (permutation, i + 1, l - j + 1, 0);
            Arrays.fill (permutation, l - j + 1, l, 1);

            return true;
        }
    }
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    int [] permutation = new int [] {0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1};
    do
    {
        for (int i: permutation)
            System.out.print(i);
        System.out.println();
    } while (nextPermutation(permutation));
}

Output for me is:

0001111
0010111
0011011
0011101
0011110
0100111
0101011
0101101
0101110
0110011
0110101
0110110
0111001
0111010
0111100
1000111
1001011
1001101
1001110
1010011
1010101
1010110
1011001
1011010
1011100
1100011
1100101
1100110
1101001
1101010
1101100
1110001
1110010
1110100
1111000
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