Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am relatively new to mongoDB. I set up a shard mongo cluster with 2 Replica Sets; each set in a shard. -> 4 mongo deamons

The deamons are distributed on 2 WIN server with 8gb ram each. I have a Test Collection with 10 mio documents (~ 600bytes / doc) and using the c# driver to connect to the mongos (primaryPreferred)

Now if i run some thousands single read-queries on the shard key I can see that mongo eats up more and more memory and stalls at around 7,2GB. Almost no more page faults and the queries are extremly fast. Good! The same with more complex queries on different document properties (Combined Index for those queries exists)

BUT

If I execute just a couple of update queries, I got a huge drop in memory usage... like mongo frees up 3GB of RAM just in no time and the so fast read queries are getting very slow.

It gets worse if i launch like 500k upserts (Save) in a row. A complex query that was taking like 2sec to run takes now 22minutes.

I get the same behavior for Count-Queries with the same query parameters.

Is that a rather normal mongoDB behaviour or is there something that I missed to set up?

--- UPDATE @hwatkins

  1. MongoDB version: 2.2.2
  2. 1 document scanned for a single upsert
  3. I Have quite high disk activity during the bulk-upsert

explain() for a complex count- query before upsert

Count Explain: { "clusteredType" : "ParallelSort", "shards" : { "set1/xxxx:1234,yyyy:1234" : [{ "cursor" : "BtreeCursor AC", "isMultiKey" : false, "n" : 20799, "nscannedObjects" : 292741, "nscanned" : 292741, "nscannedObjectsAllPlans" : 294290, "nscannedAllPlans" : 294290, "scanAndOrder" : false, "indexOnly" : false, "nYields" : 2, "nChunkSkips" : 0, "millis" : 2382, "indexBounds" : { "f.14.b" : [["A", "A"]], "f.500.b" : [[10, 50]] }, "allPlans" : [{ "cursor" : "BtreeCursor AC", "n" : 20795, "nscannedObjects" : 292741, "nscanned" : 292741, "indexBounds" : { "f.14.b" : [["A", "A"]], "f.500.b" : [[10, 50]] } }, { "cursor" : "BasicCursor", "n" : 4, "nscannedObjects" : 1549, "nscanned" : 1549, "indexBounds" : { } }], "oldPlan" : { "cursor" : "BtreeCursor AC", "indexBounds" : { "f.14.b" : [["A", "A"]], "f.500.b" : [[10, 50]] } }, "server" : "xxxx:1234" }], "set2/xxxx:56789,yyyy:56789" : [{ "cursor" : "BtreeCursor AC", "isMultiKey" : false, "n" : 7000, "nscannedObjects" : 97692, "nscanned" : 97692, "nscannedObjectsAllPlans" : 98941, "nscannedAllPlans" : 98941, "scanAndOrder" : false, "indexOnly" : false, "nYields" : 0, "nChunkSkips" : 0, "millis" : 729, "indexBounds" : { "f.14.b" : [["A", "A"]], "f.500.b" : [[10, 50]] }, "allPlans" : [{ "cursor" : "BtreeCursor AC", "n" : 6996, "nscannedObjects" : 97692, "nscanned" : 97692, "indexBounds" : { "f.14.b" : [["A", "A"]], "f.500.b" : [[10, 50]] } }, { "cursor" : "BasicCursor", "n" : 4, "nscannedObjects" : 1249, "nscanned" : 1249, "indexBounds" : { } }], "oldPlan" : { "cursor" : "BtreeCursor AC", "indexBounds" : { "f.14.b" : [["A", "A"]], "f.500.b" : [[10, 50]] } }, "server" : "yyyy:56789" }] }, "cursor" : "BtreeCursor AC", "n" : 27799, "nChunkSkips" : 0, "nYields" : 2, "nscanned" : 390433, "nscannedAllPlans" : 393231, "nscannedObjects" : 390433, "nscannedObjectsAllPlans" : 393231, "millisShardTotal" : 3111, "millisShardAvg" : 1555, "numQueries" : 2, "numShards" : 2, "millis" : 2384 }

explain() after upsert for the same query

{ "clusteredType" : "ParallelSort", "shards" : { "set1/xxxx:1234,yyyy:1234" : [{ "cursor" : "BtreeCursor AC", "isMultiKey" : false, "n" : 20799, "nscannedObjects" : 292741, "nscanned" : 292741, "nscannedObjectsAllPlans" : 294290, "nscannedAllPlans" : 294290, "scanAndOrder" : false, "indexOnly" : false, "nYields" : 379, "nChunkSkips" : 0, "millis" : 391470, "indexBounds" : { "f.14.b" : [["A", "A"]], "f.500.b" : [[10, 50]] }, "allPlans" : [{ "cursor" : "BtreeCursor AC", "n" : 20795, "nscannedObjects" : 292741, "nscanned" : 292741, "indexBounds" : { "f.14.b" : [["A", "A"]], "f.500.b" : [[10, 50]] } }, { "cursor" : "BasicCursor", "n" : 4, "nscannedObjects" : 1549, "nscanned" : 1549, "indexBounds" : { } }], "server" : "xxxx:1234" }], "set2/xxxx:56789,yyyy:56789" : [{ "cursor" : "BtreeCursor AC", "isMultiKey" : false, "n" : 7000, "nscannedObjects" : 97692, "nscanned" : 97692, "nscannedObjectsAllPlans" : 98941, "nscannedAllPlans" : 98941, "scanAndOrder" : false, "indexOnly" : false, "nYields" : 0, "nChunkSkips" : 0, "millis" : 910, "indexBounds" : { "f.14.b" : [["A", "A"]], "f.500.b" : [[10, 50]] }, "allPlans" : [{ "cursor" : "BtreeCursor AC", "n" : 6996, "nscannedObjects" : 97692, "nscanned" : 97692, "indexBounds" : { "f.14.b" : [["A", "A"]], "f.500.b" : [[10, 50]] } }, { "cursor" : "BasicCursor", "n" : 4, "nscannedObjects" : 1249, "nscanned" : 1249, "indexBounds" : { } }], "oldPlan" : { "cursor" : "BtreeCursor AC", "indexBounds" : { "f.14.b" : [["A", "A"]], "f.500.b" : [[10, 50]] } }, "server" : "yyyy:56789" }] }, "cursor" : "BtreeCursor AC", "n" : 27799, "nChunkSkips" : 0, "nYields" : 379, "nscanned" : 390433, "nscannedAllPlans" : 393231, "nscannedObjects" : 390433, "nscannedObjectsAllPlans" : 393231, "millisShardTotal" : 392380, "millisShardAvg" : 196190, "numQueries" : 2, "numShards" : 2, "millis" : 391486 }

Btw: *One single upsert (one affected doc) lets the memory usage drop by around 600MB. --> ~ 4,5GB mem usage reached only after some queries.

  • if i take the query from above and i use the mongoCursor to loop on the result-set it just takes ages... (query still running as i type) :(

UPDATE II @Daniel

Here you got a sample doc stored in the mongoDB-Cluster. The Shard Key is the b -Property of my doc (it corresponds to a telephone number)

Upsert: I search back existing docs by the shard-key and update some properties of the f- array. Then I call Save on the mongoDB driver for all those docs one by one (like 500k times).

There is an index: { "f.14.b" : 1, "f.500.b" : 1 } This index is used for complex queries. Like described above those queries are fast before the bulk-update and extremely slow after the update.

   {
  "_id" : ObjectId("51248d6xxxxxxxxxxxxx"),
  "b" : "33600000000",
  "f" : {
    "500" : {
      "a" : ISODate("2013-02-20T08:45:38.075Z"),
      "b" : 91
    },
    "14" : {
      "a" : ISODate("2013-02-20T08:45:38.075Z"),
      "b" : "A"
    },
    "1501" : {
      "a" : ISODate("2013-02-20T08:45:38.141Z"),
      "b" : ["X", "Y", "Z"]
    },
    "2000" : {
      "a" : ISODate("2013-02-20T08:45:38.141Z"),
      "b" : false
    }
  }
}

Thanks a lot, Blume

share|improve this question
    
memory drop may be happening because of re-indexing after an upsert happens –  vikasing Mar 1 '13 at 15:55
    
how complicated are your upserts? mongodb does a ton of things during updates that may take a very very long time. Such as moving documents, rebuilding indexes, etc. Can you give an example upsert? Also what is your shard key? What are your indexes? Also your second query is yielding way more (most likely because of paging). –  Daniel Williams Mar 1 '13 at 21:57
    
@Daniel I added some more information to the question above. Hope that helps to find an explanation why my queries are turning so slow?! –  Blume Mar 6 '13 at 10:31
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This is interesting. It looks like first, your data is not very evenly distributed. Your explain shows nscanned: 292741 on the first set and nscanned: 97692 on the second set. Pretty big difference. It also shows on the first set nyields:379 and on the second set nyields:0. This implies that only are you reading unevenly from your sets, you are probably writing unevenly to them. You will get more out of your cluster if you choose a shard key that has a more even distribution.

As to why specifically this is happening with your upserts, are you adding more data to your existing documents? If so you are probably a victim of document movement. In your mongodb logs do you see any queries with moved: 1? This means the slow query in the log also had a document movement on disk which causes lots of havok with indexes into arrays/subdocuments. Mongodb I believe still will essentially have to do an index rebuild on the entire document if it moves and will have to do some heavy updating of all indexes into subdocuments/arrays.

The workaround for document movement is to preallocate extra data on document at creation then immediately remove it from the document. Mongo allocates all documents with a fixed space + padding factor on the disk. If they outgrow their space, they must be moved on the disk to a larger area. If you created your documents with already extra data then remove it, you will give yourself a lot of extra padding on disk to accomodate your document growth. This can be a waste of space for sure but it will be a big saver of performance.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Daniel for leading me in the right direction. –  Blume Mar 11 '13 at 16:10
    
Seems like it's really related to the data-distribution. I filled up my collection with an increasing shard-key. The Upsert-Process was upserting the first 500k documents of this range (like b = [33600000000;33600500000]) I recreated the DB with a random value for the shard-key and executed the upsert again (with random keys). the following count-query takes a bit longer though (~3min) but not ages like before. thanks –  Blume Mar 11 '13 at 16:19
add comment
  1. What version of mongodb are you on?

  2. When you do the upsert can you do an .explain() on it to see how many documents it's scanning.

  3. What does the disk io look like during the upserts
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.