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I have a DataTable that is filled by a Stored Procedure, and from that datatable which contains a collection of Requests(RequestNumber and Tasks(TaskId). When I have reach the first Request number with a Task, I add it to my list, then with additional datarows, I check the list to see if they exist(if(dr["RequestNumber"].ToString() != acList[i].RequestNumber)) if they do, I delete the dataRow, if not I add them to the list.

This works good in sequential order, but if the datarow and list are off by one it allows the row to be added. Is there any other way to accomplish finding if the value exists in the list.

Thanks in advance.

foreach (DataRow dRow in dt.Rows)
{
    DataRow dr = dt.NewRow();
    dr["Project"] = dRow["Project"];
    dr["RequestNumber"] = dRow["RequestNumber"];
    dr["RequestId"] = dRow["RequestId"];
    dr["TaskType"] = dRow["TaskType"];
    dr["TaskId"] = dRow["TaskId"];
    dr["TaskStatus"] = dRow["TaskStatus"];
    dr["AssignedTo"] = dRow["AssignedTo"];
    dr["DateDue"] = dRow["DateDue"];


    if (acList.Count == 0)
    {
        acList.Add(new AssignedClass
        {
            Project = dr["Project"].ToString(),
            RequestNumber = dr["RequestNumber"].ToString(),
            RequestId = dr["RequestId"].ToString(),
            TaskType = dr["TaskType"].ToString(),
            TaskId = dr["TaskId"].ToString(),
            TaskStatus = dr["TaskStatus"].ToString(),
            AssignedTo = dr["AssignedTo"].ToString(),
            DateDue = dr["DateDue"].ToString()
        });
    }

    else
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < acList.Count; i++)
        {

        if(dr["RequestNumber"].ToString() != acList[i].RequestNumber)
        {
            acList.Add(new AssignedClass
            {
                Project = dr["Project"].ToString(),
                RequestNumber = dr["RequestNumber"].ToString(),
                RequestId = dr["RequestId"].ToString(),
                TaskType = dr["TaskType"].ToString(),
                TaskId = dr["TaskId"].ToString(),
                TaskStatus = dr["TaskStatus"].ToString(),
                AssignedTo = dr["AssignedTo"].ToString(),
                DateDue = dr["DateDue"].ToString()
            });
        }
        else
        {
            dr.Delete();
        }
      }
    }
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1  
What version of .NET are you using? Are you able to use LINQ? –  mellamokb Mar 1 '13 at 14:47
4  
Start from the beginning. You have a DataTable, what do you want to do with it? You code seem a bit complex for what it looks like it is doing. –  Ash Burlaczenko Mar 1 '13 at 14:48
    
4.0 and I have the ability to use Linq, but I am not to familur with the language –  jpavlov Mar 1 '13 at 14:50
    
Like @AshBurlaczenko said, you need to take step back and re-implement your logic. This looks like overkill from a coding perspective. Pick a pen and write how the logic should be and re-implement –  codingbiz Mar 1 '13 at 14:56
    
I don't see a List so where is the code that uses a List? If you want help you will have to tell us what types your expecting within the DataTable. –  Ramhound Mar 1 '13 at 15:06
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Using LINQ, it's as simple as checking if there are any matches:

if ( !acList.Any(a => a.RequestNumber == dr["RequestNumber"].ToString() )
    acList.Add( ... );

Also, it seems that the code at the beginning assigning dRow to dr has no purpose. Just use dRow directly throughout the rest of your code. And I don't think you want to treat (acList.Count == 0) as a special case, because that just causes you to have to duplicate your logic and thus maintain two separate copies of the same code. So if I understood everything correctly, this simplified code should accomplish the same thing:

foreach (DataRow dRow in dt.Rows)
{
    if ( !acList.Any(a => a.RequestNumber == dRow["RequestNumber"].ToString() )
    {
        acList.Add(new AssignedClass
        {
            Project = dRow["Project"].ToString(),
            RequestNumber = dRow["RequestNumber"].ToString(),
            RequestId = dRow["RequestId"].ToString(),
            TaskType = dRow["TaskType"].ToString(),
            TaskId = dRow["TaskId"].ToString(),
            TaskStatus = dRow["TaskStatus"].ToString(),
            AssignedTo = dRow["AssignedTo"].ToString(),
            DateDue = dRow["DateDue"].ToString()
        });
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this worked perfect! –  jpavlov Mar 1 '13 at 15:14
    
This approach is not too effective. As you scan up to all items in acList again and again for each Row. So if there are a lot of rows this can bring down performance. –  Woodman Mar 1 '13 at 16:12
    
@Woodman: There would have to be 1000's of rows before you would begin to notice a performance hit. I prefer the approach of writing simple, readable code first, and then optimize later after profiling (not guessing) where the real performance issues are. –  mellamokb Mar 1 '13 at 16:54
    
Completely agree with you here, just think it worths to be mentioned. –  Woodman Mar 1 '13 at 18:02
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This would be a great job for LINQ's Union method, but it requires an IEqualityComparer<AssignedClass> implementation. Unless you do this often, it's probably not worth coding (even though it's 10-ish lines if done properly). This would help, however:

acList = acList
    .Concat(from row in dt.Rows
            from ac in acList
            where ac.RequestNumber != row["RequestNumber"].ToString()
            select AssignedClassFromDataRow(row))
    .ToList();

where

private static AssignedClass AssignedClassFromDataRow(DataRow row)
{
    // maybe some checks...
    return new AssignedClass
    {
        Project = dRow["Project"].ToString(),
        RequestNumber = dRow["RequestNumber"].ToString(),
        RequestId = dRow["RequestId"].ToString(),
        TaskType = dRow["TaskType"].ToString(),
        TaskId = dRow["TaskId"].ToString(),
        TaskStatus = dRow["TaskStatus"].ToString(),
        AssignedTo = dRow["AssignedTo"].ToString(),
        DateDue = dRow["DateDue"].ToString()
    }
}

Slightly more time complex than a hash-based solution, but simple enough to implement.

EDIT:

If you actually need the extra performance provided by hashing, you can write the EqualityComparer (but keep in mind these guidelines). Such solution would look like this in the end:

acList = acList
    .Union(
        dt.Rows.Select(AssignedClassFromDataRow),
        new MyAssignedClassRequestNumberComparer())
    .ToList();
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You can use HashSet<AssignedClass>, all you need is to create custom IEqualityComarer<AssignedClass> in which you check RequestNumber property of passed objects, and pass instance of this comparer in constructor of HashSet

Edit

Here is possible implementation of IEqualityComarer<AssignedClass> :

public class AssignedClassComparer : IEqualityComparer<AssignedClass>
{
    public bool Equals(AssignedClass x, AssignedClass y)
    {
        return x.RequestNumber == y.RequestNumber;
    }

    public int GetHashCode(AssignedClass obj)
    {
        return obj.RequestNumber.GetHashCode();
    }
}

EDIT2: Or you can simply use HashSet to store only keys, while enumerating through rows:

var keys = new HashSet<string>();

foreach (DataRow dRow in dt.Rows)
{
    if (keys.Add(dRow["RequestNumber"].ToString()))
    {
        acList.Add(new AssignedClass
        {
            Project = dRow["Project"].ToString(),
            RequestNumber = dRow["RequestNumber"].ToString(),
            RequestId = dRow["RequestId"].ToString(),
            TaskType = dRow["TaskType"].ToString(),
            TaskId = dRow["TaskId"].ToString(),
            TaskStatus = dRow["TaskStatus"].ToString(),
            AssignedTo = dRow["AssignedTo"].ToString(),
            DateDue = dRow["DateDue"].ToString()
        });
    }
}
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With the option of linq and taking into account that the beginning code block and the check for 0 entries seem a bit redundant. I think the process could boil down to

var distinctRows = dt.Rows.GroupBy(x => x["RequestNumber"]).Select(x => x.First());
acList.AddRange(distinctRows.Select(x => x.MapToAssignedClass());


// Added Mapping method for readability
public static AssignedClass MapToAssignedClass(this DataRow dr)
{
    return new AssignedClass
    {
        Project = dr["Project"].ToString(),
        RequestNumber = dr["RequestNumber"].ToString(),
        RequestId = dr["RequestId"].ToString(),
        TaskType = dr["TaskType"].ToString(),
        TaskId = dr["TaskId"].ToString(),
        TaskStatus = dr["TaskStatus"].ToString(),
        AssignedTo = dr["AssignedTo"].ToString(),
        DateDue = dr["DateDue"].ToString()
    });
}
share|improve this answer
1  
You have distinct rows from the dt, but you still have to check for duplicates in the dt union acList. AddRange might create such duplicates. –  Honza Brestan Mar 1 '13 at 15:10
    
@HonzaBrestan, Are you saying acList may already contain items? In that case then yes you are right but I didn't get that would be the case from the question. –  Ash Burlaczenko Mar 1 '13 at 15:51
    
Check the provided code, there's a condition on acList.Count and duplicates are only checked when it's not empty. –  Honza Brestan Mar 1 '13 at 15:54
    
@HonzaBrestan, I can see the provided code. From it there is nothing which shows acList as containing item before the code is entered. As I read it the acList.Count if there for the first iteration of the loop. –  Ash Burlaczenko Mar 1 '13 at 15:57
    
Might be, might not be - that's an assumption. –  Honza Brestan Mar 1 '13 at 15:59
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