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I'm exploring ways in which to automatically generate forms based on simple class methods of another file. The idea is that as my "items.py" package grows, the "gui.py" automatically keeps tabs and even a bit of validation. I actually got something working a bit:

Function file:

def PrintHelloSomeone(str_someone):
  print "Hello %s" % str_someone

def PrintN(int_N):
  print "%i" % int_N

def PrintRange(int_min, int_max):
  print range(int_min, int_max)

GUI file:

import inspect
from PySide import QtGui

class AutoForm(QtGui.QFormLayout):
  ARG2GUI = {
    'int' : (QtGui.QSpinBox, 'value'),
    'str' : (QtGui.QLineEdit, 'text'),
  }

  def __init__(self, (name, function)):
    super(AutoForm, self).__init__()
    self.function = function

    self.addRow(QtGui.QLabel(name))

    self.call_list = []
    for arg in inspect.getargspec(function).args:
      self.call_list.append(self.arg2widget(arg))

    button = QtGui.QPushButton("Run")
    button.clicked.connect(self.call_function)
    self.addRow(None, button)

  def arg2widget(self, arg):
    tp, name = arg.split('_')
    widget_obj, call = self.ARG2GUI[tp]
    widget = widget_obj()
    widget_call = getattr(widget, call)
    self.addRow(name, widget)
    return widget_call

  def call_function(self):
    args = [call() for call in self.call_list]
    self.function(*args)

if __name__ == '__main__':
  import sys
  import stuff

  app = QtGui.QApplication(sys.argv)

  w = QtGui.QWidget()
  w.show()
  w.setLayout(QtGui.QHBoxLayout())

  for function in inspect.getmembers(stuff, inspect.isfunction):
    w.layout().addLayout(AutoForm(function))

  sys.exit(app.exec_())

The code actually seems to work, but I was wondering if there are better ways to do what I am trying to do.

share|improve this question
2  
Check out code.google.com/p/formlayout. It's not quite what you're looking for since it generates the forms based in tuples instead of function signatures, but maybe it is a starting point. –  rainer Mar 1 '13 at 17:33
1  
The idea is nice, and seems to work fine. If you are doing Python 3 maybe it would be worth using function annotations, instead of depending on the argument names. Otherwise it is a nice approach. –  jsbueno Mar 2 '13 at 4:17

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