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I want to cast a custom class to a string which compiles in VS2005 very well. But in VS2012 I get the compiler error error C2440: 'type cast' : cannot convert from 'A' to 'std::string'. What do I have to change? This is my example:

    #include <string>

    using namespace std;

    class A
    {
    public:
      A& operator=(const char* c);
      operator string ();
      operator const char* ();

    private:
      string value;
    };

    A::operator string () { return string((const char*)(*this)); }
    A& A::operator = (const char* aValue)   { value = aValue; return *this; }
    A::operator const char *() { const char* wort = "Hello"; return wort; }

    int main() 
    {
      A a;
      string s = (string)a; // C2440
    }
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This working fine wth VS2010. You can please have a look at this answer probably you may get some clue. stackoverflow.com/questions/3558589/… –  Rasmi Ranjan Nayak Mar 1 '13 at 15:03
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The problem is that there are two possible explicit conversions from A to string - via the conversion operator to string; or via the conversion operator to const char *, then via the conversion constructor to string.

Simply making the conversion implicit will resolve the ambiguity; the second conversion requires two user-defined conversions, and so cannot be chosen for an implicit conversion:

string s = a;

However, the class is still a bit flaky, since sometimes you might need an explicit conversion. I would consider removing at least one of the implicit conversion operators - perhaps replace them with explicit operators (if your compiler supports such things), or with named functions (like string itself does with c_str()).

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It is Visual Studio 2012. The CTP supports explicit conversion operators. –  chris Mar 1 '13 at 15:09
    
@chris: look at my comment to sehe –  alex555 Mar 1 '13 at 15:54
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Your two conversion operators step on each others toes. Each of them works for implicit conversions. But an explicit cast is like a direct constructor call. In your code

string s = (string)a;

is equivalent to

string s = static_cast<string>(a);

which transforms to something like

string tmp(a);
string s(std::move(tmp)); // this move can be elided
// lifetime of tmp ends here

The crux is the direct initialization string tmp(a). There are two viable string constructors: string(const string&) and explicit string(const char *) and your two conversions allow calling either. As neither conversion sequence is better, the call is ambiguous.

By the way, the version using copy initialization without explicit cast is not ambiguous:

string s = a;

should work. Depending on that is very brittle, so not recommended.

You should make your conversion operators explicit (if you are using C++11) or drop one of them.

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The conversion is ambiguous.

Stay away from C style casts, and prefer to make the conversions explicit.

#include <string>

using namespace std;

class A
{
public:
  A& operator=(const char* c);
  explicit operator string ();
  explicit operator const char* ();

private:
  string value;
};

A::operator string () { return string(static_cast<const char*>(*this)); }
A& A::operator = (const char* aValue)   { value = aValue; return *this; }
A::operator const char *() { const char* wort = "Hello"; return wort; }

int main() 
{
  A a;
  string s = static_cast<std::string>(a);
}
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You should change the C-style cast in operator string() as well ;) –  Arne Mertz Mar 1 '13 at 15:05
    
@ArneMertz good point –  sehe Mar 1 '13 at 15:07
    
Hm, your changes produce other two errors: error C2071: 'A::operator std::string' : illegal storage class. Seems to not like explicit... –  alex555 Mar 1 '13 at 15:36
1  
That's too new then for VS. Like Mike suggested, just rely on the implicit conversion then –  sehe Mar 1 '13 at 15:51
    
Yes, I see (http://blogs.msdn.com/b/vcblog/archive/2011/09/12/10209291.aspx). I will remove one. –  alex555 Mar 1 '13 at 15:57
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