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There is a line in CUDA Compiler Driver NVCC - Options for steering GPU code generation which is ambiguous to me:

Value less than the minimum registers required by ABI will be bumped up by the compiler to ABI minimum limit.

Does the ABI have any standard or limitations for the number of registers that __global__ and __device__ functions use?

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I think (can't find a reference right now) the ABI requires at least 16 registers. So if you specificy a lower register count (e.g. with -maxrregcount) the compiler will bump the specified limit up to the minimum required by the ABI, and will print an advisory message stating that it did so. As for the maximum number of 32-bit registers available per thread, it is GPU architecture dependent: 124 registers for sm_1x, 63 registers for sm_2x, and 254 registers for sm_3x. –  njuffa Mar 1 '13 at 18:10
    
but what does ABI has to do with GPU registers? Was it there before even CUDA comes to life? –  Soroosh Bateni Mar 1 '13 at 18:14
    
Generally speaking, an ABI (application binary interface) is an architecture specific convention for storage layout, passing of arguments to functions, passing of function results back to the caller etc.. ABIs (including x86_64, ARM) often designate specific registers for specific tasks such as stack pointer, function return value, function arguments etc. Since the GPU architecture allows a variable number of registers per thread, use of the ABI requires a minimal number of registers to be present to fill these defined roles. If I recall correctly, CUDA introduced an ABI with version 2.0. –  njuffa Mar 1 '13 at 18:25
    
Ok, so CUDA has an ABI, nice, If you can find a reference (possibly to CUDA ABI), that would be great, but nevertheless Post an answer and I will accept it. –  Soroosh Bateni Mar 1 '13 at 18:28
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Thanks, I provided an expanded version of the above for the answer and also corrected the CUDA version at which the ABI was introduced from 2.0 to 3.0 (it's easy to get confused after several years and many CUDA versions). –  njuffa Mar 1 '13 at 18:52

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I think (can't find a reference right now) the CUDA ABI requires at least 16 registers. So if you specificy a lower register count (e.g. with -maxrregcount) the compiler will bump the specified limit up to the minimum required by the ABI, and will print an advisory message stating that it did so. As for the maximum number of 32-bit registers available per thread, it is GPU architecture dependent: 124 registers for sm_1x, 63 registers for sm_2x, and 254 registers for sm_3x.

Generally speaking, an ABI (application binary interface) is an architecture specific convention for storage layout, passing of arguments to functions, passing of function results back to the caller etc.. ABIs (including x86_64, ARM) often designate specific registers for specific tasks such as stack pointer, function return value, function arguments etc. Since the GPU architecture allows a variable number of registers per thread, use of the ABI requires a minimal number of registers to be present to fill these defined roles. If I recall correctly, CUDA introduced an ABI with version 3.0, which was the first version to support Fermi-class GPUs.

The ABI requires compute capability 2.0 or higher. Older GPU architecture lacked hardware features required for the ABI. Most of the newer CUDA features, such as device-side printf() and malloc(), called functions, separate compilation, etc rely on and require the use of the ABI, and it is used by default in compiler generated code for sm_20 and above. You can disable the use of the ABI with -Xptxas -abi=no. I would strongly advise against doing that.

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