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A fine gentleman told me that goto statements were bad, but I don't see how I can not use it here:

int main()
{   
   using namespace std;
   int x;
   int y;
   int z;
   int a;
   int b;
   Calc: //How can i get back here, without using goto?
   {
   cout << "To begin, type a number" << endl;
   cin >> x;
   cout << "Excellent!" << endl;
   cout << "Now you need to type the second number" << endl;
   cin >> y;
   cout << "Excellent!" << endl;
   cout << "Now, what do you want to do with these numbers?" << endl;
   cout << "Alt. 1 +" << endl;
   cout << "Alt. 2 -" << endl;
   cout << "Alt. 3 *" << endl;
   cout << "Alt. 4 /" << endl;
   cin >> a;

       if (a == 1) {
    z = add(x, y);
   }

   if (a == 2) {
    z = sub(x, y);
   }

   if (a == 3) {
    z = mul(x, y);
   }

       if (a == 4) {
    z = dis(x, y);
   }
}

cout << "The answer to your math question is ";
cout << z << endl;
cout << "Do you want to enter another question?" << endl;
cout << "Type 1 for yes" << endl;
cout << "Type 0 for no" << endl;
cin >> b;

    if (b == 1) {
    goto Calc;
}
cout << "Happy trails!" << endl;
return 0;
}

It is a calculator, as you can see. Also, if you want, can you suggest a better way (If it exists) to let the user choose the operation (+ - * /). Header files are under control. I apologize for a lot of cout statements.

share|improve this question
    
Please make sure that your code is properly indented before posting it on this site. –  Lundin Mar 1 '13 at 15:24
    
if you have to use goto in a c++ program at some point it is pretty possible your algorithm is pretty dummy. for more information please read this documentation link –  Mahmut Ali ÖZKURAN Mar 1 '13 at 15:25

7 Answers 7

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Here is a cleaned-up and properly formatted version using a do/while loop for structure:

using namespace std;

int main()
{   
    int x, y, z, a, b;

    do {
        cout << "To begin, type a number" << endl;
        cin >> x;
        cout << "Excellent!" << endl;
        cout << "Now you need to type the second number" << endl;
        cin >> y;
        cout << "Excellent!" << endl;
        cout << "Now, what do you want to do with these numbers?" << endl;
        cout << "Alt. 1 +" << endl;
        cout << "Alt. 2 -" << endl;
        cout << "Alt. 3 *" << endl;
        cout << "Alt. 4 /" << endl;
        cin >> a;
        if (a == 1) {
            z = add(x, y);
        }
        else if (a == 2) {
            z = sub(x, y);
        }
        else if (a == 3) {
            z = mul(x, y);
        }
        else if (a == 4) {
            z = dis(x, y);
        }
        cout << "The answer to your math question is ";
        cout << z << endl;
        cout << "Do you want to enter another question?" << endl;
        cout << "Type 1 for yes" << endl;
        cout << "Type 0 for no" << endl;
        cin >> b;
    } while (b != 0);
    cout << "Happy trails!" << endl;
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 from me too, I figure you would have got in first with your richer answer had I not jumped in with my lazy answer... –  Nim Mar 1 '13 at 15:26
    
it should be while (b == 1) instead of (b == 0) –  sissi_luaty Mar 1 '13 at 15:27
    
@siluaty: thanks, but I edited that a while back - you might need to refresh your browser window... –  Paul R Mar 1 '13 at 15:28
    
Thank you! Is int x, y, z, a, b; an array? Also I am sorry for bad indenting :( –  Lemonizer Mar 1 '13 at 15:29
1  
@Lemonizer: no, it's just a more succinct syntax when you have a lot of variables of the same type with short names. –  Paul R Mar 1 '13 at 15:29

goto isn't automatically bad. Unreadable code is bad. Whenever you find yourself in need of some obscure programming construct like 'goto', that usually means that your code is either poorly written, or that your program design is flawed.

The solution is almost always more functions. For example:

bool run_program();
int  prompt_user_begin();
int  prompt_user_again();
int  prompt_operation_type();
bool prompt_continue();


int main()
{
  while(run_program())
  {}

  cout << "Happy trails!" << endl;
  return 0; 
}


bool run_program()
{
  int first;
  int second;
  int operation_type;
  int result;

  first  = prompt_user_begin();
  cout << "Excellent!" << endl;

  second = prompt_user_again();
  cout << "Excellent!" << endl;

  operation_type = prompt_operation_type();

  switch(operation_type)
  {
    case 1: result = add(first, second); break;
    case 2: result = sub(first, second); break;
    case 3: result = mul(first, second); break;
    case 4: result = div(first, second); break;
  }

  cout << "The answer to your math question is ";
  cout << result << endl;

  return prompt_continue();
}

int prompt_user_begin ()
{
  int x;
  cout << "To begin, type a number" << endl;
  cin >> x;

  return x;
}

int prompt_user_again ()
{
  int x;
  cout << "Now you need to type the second number" << endl;
  cin >> x;
  return x;
}

int prompt_operation_type ()
{
  int x;
  cout << "Now, what do you want to do with these numbers?" << endl;
  cout << "Alt. 1 +" << endl;
  cout << "Alt. 2 -" << endl;
  cout << "Alt. 3 *" << endl;
  cout << "Alt. 4 /" << endl;
  cin >> x;
  return x;
}

bool prompt_continue ()
{
  int x;
  cout << "Do you want to enter another question?" << endl;
  cout << "Type 1 for yes" << endl;
  cout << "Type 0 for no" << endl;
  cin >> x;
  return x==1;
}
share|improve this answer

You can easily avoid 'goto' in your code. Just divide it into functions:

using namespace std;

void question () {
  cout << "To begin, type a number" << endl;
  cin >> x;

  // put rest of the code here
}

int main () {
  int ask = 1;
  while ( ask == 1 ) {
    question();
    cout << "Do you want to enter another question?" << endl;
    cout << "Type 1 for yes" << endl;
    cout << "Type 0 for no" << endl;
    cin >> ask;
  }

  return 0;
}

Edit: as noted in the comments, using do-while would be actually an better option.

share|improve this answer
1  
Using "do-while2 would be a better choice, I think. –  Mats Petersson Mar 1 '13 at 15:24
    
Can you elaborate on why? –  kamituel Mar 1 '13 at 15:26
1  
Because that would avoid having to (unnecessarily) set ask = 1 and then immediately after checking if it's 1 - and then looping back to the top of the loop when ask is zero, only to then jump back out again because it's not ask == 1. do-while makes it clear that you want to test a condition at the end of the loop - so you always want to run at least once, and the loop ends at the bottom. –  Mats Petersson Mar 1 '13 at 15:34
    
@Mats - while that's the logical flow, any modern compiler would optimize out the "initial immediate check" and stick the conditional jump on the end anyway. That said, I'd go with do-while as well... –  mark Mar 1 '13 at 15:36
    
I don't trust compilers to do things that I can tell it immediately - but in this case, it's more of a "tell the reader of the code that this loop runs at least once". –  Mats Petersson Mar 1 '13 at 15:37

Short answer to actual question: No, you should not use goto in this code. There is no need for it.

The use of goto should be "when it makes the code clearer or safer". The typical example of "makes the code clearer" is when there several layers of nested loops, and some particular situation requires leaving all the nesting levels, and adding a "do we want to exit the loop" makes the code more complicated. An example of "making it safer" is if a function holds a lock, opens a file or something similar, and needs to return early - but you also need to close the file or release the lock, using "goto exit_now;" is safer than trying to remember what locks, files, etc are held and then doing return;.

This:

if (a == 1) {
    z = add(x, y);
}
if (a == 2) {
    z = sub(x, y);
}
if (a == 3) {
    z = mul(x, y);
}
if (a == 4) {
    z = dis(x, y);
}

is a classic case of you should use 'switch':

switch(a)
{
   case 1:
     z = add(x, y);
     break;
   case 2:
     z = sub(x, y);
     break;
  ....
}

Makes the code clearer - there is also no confusion about whether a changes value and maybe another if statement becomes viable.

share|improve this answer
  • goto makes it difficult to track where execution is coming from, and where it's going.

  • goto encourages spagetti-code, unless you restrict heavily where it is used (e.g. you could argue that you only use it for cleanup blocks, but such an argument makes no sense in the presence of RAII).

  • you are using a goto to simulate a loop. Why are you not writing a loop instead?

  • it's obscure and thus, makes your code less available to other people.

  • goto makes it more difficult to track objects lifetimes.

share|improve this answer
    
My only programming experience is from a TI-84 calculator. I use the statements that I know :P –  Lemonizer Mar 1 '13 at 15:34
    
That makes sense. Either way, have a look at loops for code you need to execute more than once (i.e. use loops instead of gotos where this applies), and RAII for resource cleanup (i.e. use RAII instead of gotos for resource cleanup). –  utnapistim Mar 1 '13 at 15:37

the "more generally accepted" approach in this case would be a do {...} while(b==1); but the compiled results would likely be identical.

share|improve this answer
    
frankly the compiled results are irrelevant, maintainers typically read the C++ code, not the generated assembly... –  Nim Mar 1 '13 at 15:35
    
@Nim Absurdly many people worry absurdly much about "performance" (quotes because their approach to that is often questionable and ineffectual) though, so it may be worth mentioning. –  delnan Mar 1 '13 at 15:37
    
i mention it strictly from an educational perspective... he's learning a language. i have found that knowing what a compiler does with my uses of the language has impacted my code quality in a positive way, i.e. focus on readability when you know the compiler can work out the performance details... –  mark Mar 1 '13 at 15:43

Erm , use a proper looping construct, while, for etc.

share|improve this answer
    
Why would that be better than goto? –  iamnotmaynard Mar 1 '13 at 15:21
5  
the intention is clearer, this code will loop till some condition is met, that is exactly what these constructs are for. goto is useful in some rare cases, but this is not one... –  Nim Mar 1 '13 at 15:22
2  
-1 You really need to add some rationale behind this answer. Your personal opinion, with no reason or source given, holds no merit. –  Lundin Mar 1 '13 at 15:26
    
@iamnotmaynard - this one goto isn't too bad. But start adding more and more of them and when you trace execution you end up with lots of potential for confusion about how you got where you are; this is known as "spaghetti code". Structured programming uses only well-defined control constructs such as if, for, and while that announce up front what they're doing, instead of telling you at the end that the sequence of execution is changing. –  Pete Becker Mar 1 '13 at 15:32
1  
@Nim There you go, you should add those words to your answer instead of a comment directed to me :) I am not arguing about the use of goto, I'm just pointing out that a single line opinion is not a good answer format on this site. –  Lundin Mar 1 '13 at 15:53

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