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In my java project, I'm passing FileInputStream to a function, I need to convert (typecast FileInputStream to string), How to do it.??

public static void checkfor(FileInputStream fis) {
   String a=new String;
   a=fis         //how to do convert fileInputStream into string
   print string here
}
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2  
what are you trying to achieve? naive is fis.toString(); –  Nikolay Kuznetsov Mar 1 '13 at 15:48
2  
Well, there's always, fis.toString(), though that might probably not what you wanted. Why would you want to turn fis into a String? –  akaIDIOT Mar 1 '13 at 15:49
    
you want the content of file input stream into string ? –  Arpit Mar 1 '13 at 15:49
1  
Here's a good resource for you to start: docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/essential/io –  theMarceloR Mar 1 '13 at 15:49
    
Note: It's recommended to use the new NIO.2 File API instead of FileInputStream: docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/essential/io/file.html –  Puce Mar 1 '13 at 16:05
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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can't directly convert it to string. You should implement something like this Add this code to your method

StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
int ch;
while((ch = fis.read()) != -1){
    builder.append((char)ch);
}

System.out.println(builder.toString());
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reading stream character by character isn't efficient. –  Aubin Mar 1 '13 at 15:54
    
May be :) I think he is not looking for the efficient way, he is just trying to learn –  Arsen Alexanyan Mar 1 '13 at 15:59
    
Actually, reading characters can be more efficient that reading lines which are strings, because a to make a String, you have top copy each of the characters in to the String, and that is only to return a String which is then copied to another String.... –  AgilePro Mar 1 '13 at 16:01
    
@Aubin Why it is not efficient? –  Arsen Alexanyan Mar 1 '13 at 16:05
    
The native methods for moving a block of byte or characters can be faster than a loop that handles each character. However, what is more important is to look at whether there is needless extra search, converting, and copying of data, which accounts for more overhead than the character loop overhead. By the way, this answer is putting a byte into a character, which is a problem. –  AgilePro Mar 1 '13 at 16:13
show 3 more comments
public static String getFileContent(
   FileInputStream fis,
   String          encoding ) throws IOException
{
   try( BufferedReader br =
           new BufferedReader( new InputStreamReader(fis, encoding )))
   {
      StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
      String line;
      while(( line = br.readLine()) != null ) {
         sb.append( line );
         sb.append( '\n' );
      }
      return sb.toString();
   }
}
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Depending on the requirements of the Original Poster, perhaps needed the file encoding and line separator (or read as it appears in the file). –  Paul Vargas Mar 1 '13 at 16:03
    
Yes, you're right but when reading stream to RAM we may accept the line terminator will be normalized into \n (assumption to debate) –  Aubin Mar 1 '13 at 16:06
    
The close should happen in a finally block, or better in a try-with-resource block. –  Puce Mar 1 '13 at 16:06
1  
You need to specify the character encoding. You can not assume that the platform default encoding will be correct. –  AgilePro Mar 1 '13 at 16:10
    
Suggestion adopted! –  Aubin Mar 1 '13 at 16:11
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Don't make the mistake of relying upon or needlessly converting/losing endline characters. Do it character by character. Don't forget to use the proper character encoding to interpres the stream.

public String getFileContent( FileInputStream fis ) {
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    Reader r = new InputStreamReader(fis, "UTF-8");  //or whatever encoding
    int ch = r.read();
    while(ch >= 0) {
        sb.append(ch);
        ch = r.read();
    }
    return sb.toString();
}

If you want to make this a little more efficient, you can use arrays of characters instead, but to be honest, looping over the characters can be still quite fast.

public String getFileContent( FileInputStream fis ) {
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    Reader r = new InputStreamReader(fis, "UTF-8");  //or whatever encoding
    char[] buf = new char[1024];
    int amt = r.read(buf);
    while(amt > 0) {
        sb.append(buf, 0, amt);
        amt = r.read(buf);
    }
    return sb.toString();
}
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reading stream character by character isn't efficient. –  Aubin Mar 1 '13 at 15:57
    
Actually, there is good reason to believe it is more efficient than the code that is scanning for, and manipulating, the end of line characters, then copying that into a string for return. Character by character efficiently works with the native content of the stream. –  AgilePro Mar 1 '13 at 15:57
    
sorry, forgot the Reader to convert bytes to chars. –  AgilePro Mar 1 '13 at 16:03
1  
You can not declare a variable in the while expression part. And the read of a Reader returns int, not char. –  Roger Lindsjö Mar 1 '13 at 16:07
1  
read returns an int, not a char –  Aubin Mar 1 '13 at 16:15
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