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Is there a way to do the following in Python?

try:
  Thing1()
try_this_too:
  Thing2()
try_this_too:
  Thing3()
except:
  print "Nothing worked :-("

Note that if Thing1() succeeds, I don't want to do anything else.

share|improve this question
3  
If Thing1() is successful, do you want Thing2() to happen? – Steven Rumbalski Mar 1 '13 at 15:59
    
@StevenRumbalski, no. If Thing1() is successful nothing else need be done. But I want to keep trying things until something works. – Richard Mar 1 '13 at 16:01
up vote 8 down vote accepted
for thing in (Thing1,Thing2,Thing3):
    try:
       thing()
       break  #break out of loop, don't execute else clause
    except:   #BARE EXCEPT IS USUALLY A BAD IDEA!
       pass
else:
    print "nothing worked"
share|improve this answer
try:
  Thing1()
except:
  try:
     Thing2()
  except:
     try:
        Thing3()
     except:
        print "Nothing worked :-("
share|improve this answer
2  
Naturally, but the point of the question is to try to avoid this kind of syntactic rat's nest. – Richard Mar 1 '13 at 16:03

This extends easily to any number of functions:

funcs = (Thing1, Thing2, Thing3)

failures = 0

for func in funcs:
    try:
       func()
       break
    except Exception:
       failures += 1

if failures == len(funcs):
    print "Cry evrytime :-("
share|improve this answer
    
I prefer the for-else approach versus using a counter. – Steven Rumbalski Mar 1 '13 at 16:06
    
Yeah, I think that's better too. I upvoted mgilson's. – kindall Mar 1 '13 at 16:11

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