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I'm trying to slow down my infinite loop if CPU load exceeds certain limit, but, its just not working out right, below is the code. The if condition always results true

c=1
while [ $c -le 1 ]
do
#echo "Welcome $c times"
#php BALHABLH.php

IN=$(cat /proc/loadavg);

set -- "$IN"
IFS=" "; declare -a Array=($*)
echo "${Array[@]}"
echo "${Array[0]}"
echo "${Array[1]}"

#var = ${Array[1]}



x=$(expr "${Array[1]}" )

if [ $x > 0.91 ]
then
    echo "CPU LOAD > 0.91"
    sleep 2
fi


(( c++ ))
done
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Thought about using nice and delegate load handling to your scheduler? –  Jens Erat Mar 1 '13 at 16:12
    
> is a redirection operator. You want -gt. –  n.m. Mar 1 '13 at 16:16
2  
@n.m. Unless this is ksh93, floating point arithmetics would not work.. –  Scrutinizer Mar 1 '13 at 16:24
    
I got Centos 64 bit 6.something. I wonder if we can multiply with 100, then convert to integer? I'm really poor in bash, noob in php, therefore seek help here. THanks to ya all for the help! –  Admin YaCart.com Mar 1 '13 at 16:49
    
@Scrutinizer gotcha. –  n.m. Mar 1 '13 at 18:30
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3 Answers

You need to use bc for floating point comparison and use (( ... )) for arithmetic expressions:

if (( $(bc -l <<< "$x > 0.91") == 1 ))

Also don't use cat, use:

IN=$(</proc/loadavg)
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dogbane, tried your tip, now I'm getting this error: line 21: ((: == 1 : syntax error: operand expected (error token is "== 1 ") –  Admin YaCart.com Mar 1 '13 at 16:30
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Bash cannot use floating point arithmetic. You could do something like this:

if [ $( echo "$x > 0.91" | bc ) -eq 1 ]; then
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Thank you so much people. with your help, the code is working now! –  Admin YaCart.com Mar 1 '13 at 16:59
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Bash only handles integers. To handle floats pipe to bc like this:

[ $(echo " $x > 0.91" | bc -l) -eq 1 ]

bc returns 1 if the comparison is true. We compare with 1 (using the -eq operator).

Validation

$ cat test.sh
#!/bin/bash  
x="$1"
if [ $(echo " $x > 0.91" | bc -l) -eq 1 ]; then
   echo greater;
else 
   echo smaller;
fi
$ ./test.sh 0.5
smaller
$ ./test.sh 1.5
greater

You can also simplify your script a bit like this:

#!/bin/bash
c=10
for (( i=1;i<=c;i++ )); do
    load=$(awk '{print $2}' /proc/loadavg)
    echo "$i: load is $load"
    if (( $(echo "$load > 0.91" | bc) == 1 )); then
        echo "CPU LOAD > 0.91"       
        sleep 2
    fi
done
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Dear user000001, After implementing your advise, now I'm getting this error: "integer expression expected" –  Admin YaCart.com Mar 1 '13 at 16:20
    
I forgot an echo –  user000001 Mar 1 '13 at 16:23
    
After this fix: "[ $(echo " $x > 0.91" | bc -l) -eq 1 ]" I'm now getting this error: ./loop1.sh: line 21: bc: command not found ./loop1.sh: line 21: 0.51 > 0.91: command not found ./loop1.sh: line 21: [: -eq: unary operator expected –  Admin YaCart.com Mar 1 '13 at 16:26
    
do you have bc on your system? try echo " 1+1" | bc from a console –  user000001 Mar 1 '13 at 16:28
    
you right mate, the problem is here: echo " 1+1" | bc -bash: bc: command not found Should I fire yum install bc now" –  Admin YaCart.com Mar 1 '13 at 16:54
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