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I'm working on a neural networks project and I have 2 classes like this:

public class Net
{
    // Net object is made of neurons
    public List<Neuron> Neurons = new List<Neuron>();

    // neurons are created in Net class constructor
    public Net(int neuronCount, int neuronInputs)
    {
        for (int n = 0; n < neuronCount; n++)
        {
            Neurons.Add(new Neuron(n, neuronInputs));
        }
    }
}

public class Neuron
{
    public int index; // neuron has index

    public List<double> weights = new List<double>(); // and list of weights

    // Neuron constructor is supposed to add random weights to new neuron
    public Neuron(int neuronIndex, int neuronInputs)
    {
        Random rnd = new Random();

        for (int i = 0; i < neuronInputs; i++)
        {
            this.index = neuronIndex;
            this.weights.Add(rnd.NextDouble());
        }
    }

When I try to create network and display it's "contents":

Neuro.Net Network = new Neuro.Net(4, 4); // creating network with 4 neurons with 4 weights each

// dgv is a DataGridView for weights preview
dgv.Rows.Clear();
dgv.Columns.Clear();

// creating columns
foreach (Neuro.Neuron neuron in Network.Neurons)
{
    dgv.Columns.Add("colN" + neuron.index, "N" + neuron.index);
}

dgv.Rows.Add(Network.Neurons[0].weights.Count());

for (int n = 0; n < Network.Neurons.Count(); n++)
{
   for (int w = 0; w < Network.Neurons[n].weights.Count(); w++)
   {
       dgv.Rows[w].Cells[n].Value = Network.Neurons[n].weights[w];
   }
}

When I run that code - I'm getting something like this (all weights are identical):

enter image description here

When I saw it - I tried to debug and find my mistake. However, when I put breakpoint in the neuron constructor - my network initializes as I want (weights are different):

enter image description here

I tried to use Debug and Release configurations - same results.

Can someone explain what is going on here?

Magic?

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4  
Get the witch hunter and an exorcist... We have a serious case of demon worship and witchcraft on our hands.... –  SynerCoder Mar 1 '13 at 16:16
1  
Or indeed a problem with the Random... –  SynerCoder Mar 1 '13 at 16:17
    
I liked his original question better. "Magic?" To which my answer was going to be "Yes. Christian Magic." –  MyCodeSucks Mar 1 '13 at 16:18
1  
@SynerCoder I like your funny comment, but to make this comment useful - you should provide some URL of exorcist or something :) –  Kamil Mar 1 '13 at 16:18
    
@Kamil Okido, here is a diy manual: catholic.org/prayers/prayer.php?p=683 –  SynerCoder Mar 2 '13 at 7:43

3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted

However, when I put breakpoint in neuron constructor - my network initializes as I want (neurons are diffrent):

Presumably, the breakpoint introduces enough of a delay for Random() to be seeded with a different number. The delay can be caused by you pausing in the code (obviously) or even the non-matching evaluation of a conditional breakpoint (which slows execution slightly).

It would be better to have:

private static readonly Random _random = new Random();

And call _random.Next() without creating a new instance, such as:

public Neuron(int neuronIndex, int neuronInputs)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < neuronInputs; i++)
    {
        this.index = neuronIndex;
        this.weights.Add(_random.NextDouble());
    }
}

The parameterless constructor of Random uses Environment.TickCount (hence the difference when a delay is introduced). You could also provide your own seed if you must create a new instance every time.

This behavior is documented here, specifically:

...because the clock has finite resolution, using the parameterless constructor to create different Random objects in close succession creates random number generators that produce identical sequences of random numbers. [...] This problem can be avoided by creating a single Random object rather than multiple ones.

Alternatively, you could use System.Security.Cryptography.RNGCryptoServiceProvider.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. It helped. Is this documented somewhere? I thought im using Random.Next properly... –  Kamil Mar 1 '13 at 16:40
    
Calling Next() is the correct use; however, since you are creating a new instance of Random each time the constructor is called, you have multiple instances all initialized with the same seed. Using a static field ensures there is only one instance in total for the type. As far as it being documented, this is a fairly common question (although yours is an interesting demonstration of it). –  Tim Medora Mar 1 '13 at 16:45
    
Thanks again. Now I understand difference. –  Kamil Mar 1 '13 at 16:47
    
No problem...I also added a link to the documentation with a quote; this is "official" behavior. –  Tim Medora Mar 1 '13 at 16:48

Random numbers are generated using current system time.

When you are debugging, you allow sometime between each generation. When you run, the code, it runs so fast that the seed is the same, thus, the generated randoms are equal.

Solution: declare a class member to contain the random instance and for every new random, call .Next() method.

private static rnd = new Random();

remove this line:

Random rnd = new Random();

and you are done

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Thanks, this solution is fine too, but I can accept only 1 answer. –  Kamil Mar 1 '13 at 16:33

create a static instance of Random class.

since within constructor, Random is initialized each time, hence the possibility of similar numbers!

private static readonly Random rnd = new Random();
public Neuron(int neuronIndex, int neuronInputs)
{
    private static readonly rnd = new Random();     

    for (int i = 0; i < neuronInputs; i++)
    {
        this.index = neuronIndex;
        this.weights.Add(rnd.NextDouble());
    }
}
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