Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would like to store my GLSL shaders inside of my executable file for neatness, would having the string defined inside the function that will load them into shader objects get the strings removed from the stack when the function has returned? Should I do this some other way instead? ( I remember reading something about resource files, but I've never used those before )

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would like to store my GLSL shaders inside of my executable file for neatness,

There's very little use to this, but I can understand the motive.

would having the string defined inside the function that will load them into shader objects get the strings removed from the stack when the function has returned?

That depends on how you declare it. If you write something like this:

void foo(…)
{
    char const string[] = "....";
}

The string memory is allocated on the stack and gets initialized with the contents of the initializer string literal. The string literal itself is a pointer to a specific location in the executables constant data segment. The data segment is mapped into process address as needed (as is the rest of the executable^1.

When the function returns the memory is "freed"; well technically it's just the stack pointer that gets rolled back.

If you write it as

void bar(...)
{
    char const * string = "....";
}

The variable string is initialized with a pointer to the part of the constant data segment itself, where the string literal is located. No memory is allocated and the contents read from disk only when the page the literal resides in is actually accessed.

From a technical point of view accessing a string literal adds exactly as much memory and I/O overhead as mmap-ing a file for data access. In fact the executable itself is mmap-ed, so this is an access to a mmap-ed file already.


[1] executables waiting at a blocking syscall for a long period of time will eventually be swapped out of system memory and if when the syscall returns they get swapped back. In fact in modern OS all of system memory is treaded as a block I/O cache and process memory allocations are treated as contents of a block device (this makes implementing swap space trivial); without a backing block device, the "cache" that is process memory becomes unswappable.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much for your answer. Marked. :) –  Erkling Mar 1 '13 at 16:55

Would having the string defined inside the function that will load them into shader objects get the strings removed from the stack when the function has returned?

Yes. Stack is always "popped" once the function returns the control to the caller.

Should I do this some other way instead?

It is better to load it from the file. That way, you occupy resources only temporarily (i.e. map the file into virtual memory, transfer this to device, then unmap the file).

In case this is not an option then it would be better to define the data in static global memory so that it ends up being placed into a "Data" segment of your program. That way it will not occupy both static memory and stack (because otherwise it must be loaded into stack's memory from somewhere, which would likely be a "Data" segment anyway). For example:

void load_data()
{
    static const unsigned char mydata[] = { 0x01, 0x02, ... };
    /* Do something with "mydata" */
}
share|improve this answer
    
Elements of the executables binary "data" segment are swapped into process address space only when needed. I.e. string literals in the read only data segment behave exactly as mmaped file contents. In fact the executable file itself is just a mmap-ing into various segments. The above applies to all modern OS that support file memory mapping. –  datenwolf Mar 1 '13 at 16:42
    
@datenwolf: Do they get automatically unmapped later on to free some pages? If yes, when? –  user405725 Mar 1 '13 at 16:43
    
Yes, they do, when the OS sees it appropriate. Usually when the process blocks at a syscall and there's no other instance of the executable running using the page this resides in. This particular behavior of modern OS renders the whole start-on-demand functionality of the new Linux PID=1 process "systemd" pointless. But it applies to Windows, the *BSDs and MacOS as well. –  datenwolf Mar 1 '13 at 16:52
    
Hold on a second. OS unmaps my virtual pages when the process blocks? This is nonsense. As for the lazy mapping — that is obvious, everyone does it in page fault handler. –  user405725 Mar 1 '13 at 16:55
    
Thank you very much for your answer, I decided to mark the other as the answer due to it's longer and slightly more in depth explanation. –  Erkling Mar 1 '13 at 16:57

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.