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I want to define a class m that provides an functor-ish operation with a type signature like this:

mapify :: (a -> b) -> m a -> m b

I needed some other non-functor-ish operations as well, though. I would have liked to write something along the lines of:

class MyMap m where
  type Key m
  type Value m
  keys :: m -> [Key m]
  elems :: m -> [Value m]
  mapify :: (a -> b) -> m a -> m b -- WON'T WORK!!!

I understand why that won't work. The solution I came up with was to split it into two classes, a "normal" one plus one modelled on Functor.

{-# LANGUAGE TypeFamilies #-}

import qualified Data.Map.Lazy as M

class MyMap m where
  type Key m
  type Value m
  keys :: m -> [Key m]
  elems :: m -> [Value m]

class MyMapF m where
  mapify :: (a -> b) -> m a -> m b

instance MyMap (M.Map k v) where
  type Key (M.Map k v) = k
  type Value (M.Map k v) = v
  keys = M.keys
  elems = M.elems

instance MyMapF (M.Map k) where
  mapify = M.map

That works fine, but is there a better way?


EDIT: I really like the solution proposed by sabauma. However, when I try to create a function that uses this class, I can't get the type signature to work out.

doSomething
  :: (MyMap m1, MyMap m2, Container m1 ~ Container m2) => -- line 22
    (Value m1 -> Value m2) -> m1 -> m2                    -- line 23
doSomething f m = mapify f m                              -- line 24

The error I get is:

../Amy3.hs:22:6:
    Couldn't match type `b0' with `Value (Container m0 b0)'
      `b0' is untouchable
           inside the constraints (MyMap m1,
                                   MyMap m2,
                                   Container m1 ~ Container m2)
           bound at the type signature for
                      doSomething :: (MyMap m1, MyMap m2, Container m1 ~ Container m2) =>
                                     (Value m1 -> Value m2) -> m1 -> m2
    Expected type: a0 -> b0
      Actual type: Value m1 -> Value m2

../Amy3.hs:24:19:
    Could not deduce (m2 ~ Container m0 b0)
    from the context (MyMap m1, MyMap m2, Container m1 ~ Container m2)
      bound by the type signature for
                 doSomething :: (MyMap m1, MyMap m2, Container m1 ~ Container m2) =>
                                (Value m1 -> Value m2) -> m1 -> m2
      at ../Amy3.hs:(22,6)-(23,38)
      `m2' is a rigid type variable bound by
           the type signature for
             doSomething :: (MyMap m1, MyMap m2, Container m1 ~ Container m2) =>
                            (Value m1 -> Value m2) -> m1 -> m2
           at ../Amy3.hs:22:6
    In the return type of a call of `mapify'
    In the expression: mapify f m
    In an equation for `doSomething': doSomething f m = mapify f m

../Amy3.hs:24:28:
    Could not deduce (m1 ~ Container m0 a0)
    from the context (MyMap m1, MyMap m2, Container m1 ~ Container m2)
      bound by the type signature for
                 doSomething :: (MyMap m1, MyMap m2, Container m1 ~ Container m2) =>
                                (Value m1 -> Value m2) -> m1 -> m2
      at ../Amy3.hs:(22,6)-(23,38)
      `m1' is a rigid type variable bound by
           the type signature for
             doSomething :: (MyMap m1, MyMap m2, Container m1 ~ Container m2) =>
                            (Value m1 -> Value m2) -> m1 -> m2
           at ../Amy3.hs:22:6
    In the second argument of `mapify', namely `m'
    In the expression: mapify f m
    In an equation for `doSomething': doSomething f m = mapify f m
Failed, modules loaded: none.
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I wonder if class Functor m => MyMap m where ... wouldn't have worked? That way, you can simply reuse the Functor part and don't need to worry about m vs m a. –  Xeo May 6 at 6:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

One possibility is to encode the "Container" type using another associated type.

import qualified Data.Map.Lazy as M

class MyMap m where
  type Key m
  type Value m
  type Container m :: * -> *
  keys :: m -> [Key m]
  elems :: m -> [Value m]
  mapify :: (a -> b) -> Container m a -> Container m b

instance MyMap (M.Map k v) where
  type Key (M.Map k v) = k
  type Value (M.Map k v) = v
  type Container (M.Map k v) = M.Map k
  keys = M.keys
  elems = M.elems
  mapify = M.map

The idea being that the Container for a Map is Map k, so you bundle the Map with its associated key type. That way, your mapify function lifts your function into the container. Whether or not is is 'better' is up to you, I guess, but it does cut down on the number of type classes. You should not need the MyMapF class with your example, since MyMapF is the same as the standard Functor typeclass.

Alright, that error can be fixed by modifying the definition of mapify slightly.

class MyMap m where
  type Key m
  type Value m
  type Container m :: * -> *
  keys :: m -> [Key m]
  elems :: m -> [Value m]
  -- mapify :: (a -> b) -> Container m a -> Container m b

  -- Make sure the type-checker knows that m2 is just the container of m with
  -- a different value
  mapify :: (MyMap m2, m2 ~ Container m (Value m2)) => (Value m -> Value m2) -> m -> m2


instance MyMap (M.Map k v) where
  type Key (M.Map k v) = k
  type Value (M.Map k v) = v
  type Container (M.Map k v) = M.Map k
  keys = M.keys
  elems = M.elems
  mapify = M.map

doSomething
  :: (MyMap m1, MyMap m2, m2 ~ Container m1 (Value m2)) =>
     (Value m1 -> Value m2) -> m1 -> m2
doSomething f m = mapify f m

This will type-check. I think the problem is just that the type-checker needs a stronger hint that all you are doing is altering the Value of the MyMap instance, without changing the underlying container.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! It is much better for me, because in the domain I'm working with, all the functions "belong" together. By the way, I can't use 'Functor' because there are several "functor-ish" operations I need to provide, like 'mapValueWithKey'. However, now I'm having a type signature problem (see edit above). –  mhwombat Mar 1 '13 at 17:07
    
@mhwombat I had to change up the class definition slightly, but this new version seems to type-check. Perhaps someone else knows a better way to encode this? –  sabauma Mar 1 '13 at 17:38

I realize this question is a bit old, but I ran across it looking for something unrelated and had an idea you might like, especially since it seems a bit simpler than the one proposed by sabauma.

import qualified Data.Map.Lazy as M

class MyMap m where
  type Key m
  keys :: m a -> [Key m]
  elems :: m a -> [a]
  mapify :: (a -> b) -> m a -> m b

instance MyMap (M.Map k) where
  type Key (M.Map k) = k
  keys = M.keys
  elems = M.elems
  mapify = M.map

See also the keys package.

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