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I remember reading about an R function that would append multiple data sets and also create a new variable identifying which data set the observation came from. I've scoured the net for the past hour and can't find what I'm looking for.

df1 <- x y
       1 2
       3 4
df2 <- x y
       5 6
       7 8
df3 <- FUNCTION(df1, df2)
df3 = x y source
      1 2 df1
      3 4 df1
      5 6 df2
      7 8 df2

Does anyone know what FUNCTION could be? Or, am I imagining this?

Thanks in advance!

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Instead of editing the answer into your question, please post it as an answer and accept it if it was the answer you were looking for. –  Ananda Mahto Mar 1 '13 at 16:45
    
Yep, sorry about that dude. My first time using the board and I didn't know proper procedure. Thanks for the tip. :) –  maloneypatr Mar 5 '13 at 22:28
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It's not exactly what you asked for, but it's pretty close. Put your objects in a named list and use do.call(rbind...)

> do.call(rbind, list(df1 = df1, df2 = df2))
      x y
df1.1 1 2
df1.2 3 4
df2.1 5 6
df2.2 7 8

Notice that the row names now reflect the source data.frames.

Update: Use cbind and rbind

Another option is to make a basic function like the following:

AppendMe <- function(dfNames) {
  do.call(rbind, lapply(dfNames, function(x) {
    cbind(get(x), source = x)
  }))
}

This function then takes a character vector of the data.frame names that you want to "stack", as follows:

> AppendMe(c("df1", "df2"))
  x y source
1 1 2    df1
2 3 4    df1
3 5 6    df2
4 7 8    df2

Update 2: Use combine from the "gdata" package

> library(gdata)
> combine(df1, df2)
  x y source
1 1 2    df1
2 3 4    df1
3 5 6    df2
4 7 8    df2
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Yep, that was the exact same problem I was getting using the append function. From there you can create a new variable = row.names and then parse everything after the period. Thanks for your quick reply! –  maloneypatr Mar 1 '13 at 16:42
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I'm not sure if such a function already exists, but this seems to do the trick:

bindAndSource <-  function(df1, df2) { 
  df1$source <- as.character(match.call())[[2]]
  df2$source <- as.character(match.call())[[3]]
  rbind(df1, df2)
}

results:

bindAndSource(df1, df2)

1 1 2    df1
2 3 4    df1
3 5 6    df2
4 7 8    df2


Caveat: This will not work in *aply-like calls

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Oh, I like this method! I'm not comfortable with using match.call yet, but the more I read these boards the more important it seems to be in creating functions! Thanks dude! –  maloneypatr Mar 1 '13 at 16:38
    
@PaddyMaloney, use match.call cautiously. ;) –  Ricardo Saporta Mar 1 '13 at 17:37
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A blend of the other two answers:

df1 <- data.frame(x = 1:3,y = 1:3)
df2 <- data.frame(x = 4:6,y = 4:6)

> foo <- function(...){
    args <- list(...)
    result <- do.call(rbind,args)
    result$source <- rep(as.character(match.call()[-1]),times = sapply(args,nrow))
    result
 }

> foo(df1,df2,df1)
  x y source
1 1 1    df1
2 2 2    df1
3 3 3    df1
4 4 4    df2
5 5 5    df2
6 6 6    df2
7 1 1    df1
8 2 2    df1
9 3 3    df1

If you want to avoid the match.call business, you can always limit yourself to naming the function arguments (i.e. df1 = df1, df2 = df2) and using names(args) to access the names.

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Thanks for quick help! –  maloneypatr Mar 1 '13 at 16:49
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Another workaround for this one is using ldply in the plyr package...

df1 <- data.frame(x = c(1,3), y = c(2,4))
df2 <- data.frame(x = c(5,7), y = c(6,8))
list = list(df1 = df1, df2 = df2)
df3 <- ldply(list)

df3
  .id x y
  df1 1 2
  df1 3 4
  df2 5 6
  df2 7 8
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