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I have a ShippingDestination entity that I only want a new one saved if it doesn't already exist. It must match exactly.

Will Hibernate or Spring be able to help with this, or is this portion all up to me?

@javax.persistence.Table(name = "Shipping_Destination", schema = "", catalog = "production_queue")
@Entity
public class ShippingDestination {
    private Integer id;

    @javax.persistence.Column(name = "id", nullable = false, insertable = true, updatable = true, length = 10, precision = 0)
    @Id
    @GeneratedValue
    public Integer getId() {
        return id;
    }

    public void setId(Integer id) {
        this.id = id;
    }

    private String recipient;

    @javax.persistence.Column(name = "recipient", nullable = false, insertable = true, updatable = true, length = 32, precision = 0)
    @Basic
    public String getRecipient() {
        return recipient;
    }

    @JsonProperty("Recipient")
    public void setRecipient(String recipient) {
        this.recipient = recipient;
    }

    private String street;

    @javax.persistence.Column(name = "street", nullable = false, insertable = true, updatable = true, length = 255, precision = 0)
    @Basic
    public String getStreet() {
        return street;
    }

    @JsonProperty("Street")
    public void setStreet(String street) {
        this.street = street;
    }

    private String street2;

    @javax.persistence.Column(name = "street2", nullable = false, insertable = true, updatable = true, length = 255, precision = 0)
    @Basic
    public String getStreet2() {
        return street2;
    }

    @JsonProperty("Street2")
    public void setStreet2(String street2) {
        this.street2 = street2;
    }

    private String city;

    @javax.persistence.Column(name = "city", nullable = false, insertable = true, updatable = true, length = 128, precision = 0)
    @Basic
    public String getCity() {
        return city;
    }

    @JsonProperty("City")
    public void setCity(String city) {
        this.city = city;
    }

    private String state;

    @javax.persistence.Column(name = "state", nullable = false, insertable = true, updatable = true, length = 2, precision = 0)
    @Basic
    public String getState() {
        return state;
    }

    @JsonProperty("State")
    public void setState(String state) {
        this.state = state;
    }

    private String postalCode;

    @javax.persistence.Column(name = "postal_code", nullable = false, insertable = true, updatable = true, length = 12, precision = 0)
    @Basic
    public String getPostalCode() {
        return postalCode;
    }

    @JsonProperty("PostalCode")
    public void setPostalCode(String postalCode) {
        this.postalCode = postalCode;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object o) {
        if (this == o) return true;
        if (o == null || getClass() != o.getClass()) return false;

        ShippingDestination that = (ShippingDestination) o;

        if (city != null ? !city.equals(that.city) : that.city != null) return false;
        if (id != null ? !id.equals(that.id) : that.id != null) return false;
        if (postalCode != null ? !postalCode.equals(that.postalCode) : that.postalCode != null) return false;
        if (recipient != null ? !recipient.equals(that.recipient) : that.recipient != null) return false;
        if (state != null ? !state.equals(that.state) : that.state != null) return false;
        if (street != null ? !street.equals(that.street) : that.street != null) return false;

        return true;
    }

    @Override
    public int hashCode() {
        int result = id != null ? id.hashCode() : 0;
        result = 31 * result + (recipient != null ? recipient.hashCode() : 0);
        result = 31 * result + (street != null ? street.hashCode() : 0);
        result = 31 * result + (city != null ? city.hashCode() : 0);
        result = 31 * result + (state != null ? state.hashCode() : 0);
        result = 31 * result + (postalCode != null ? postalCode.hashCode() : 0);
        return result;
    }

    private Collection<Order> orders;

    @OneToMany(mappedBy = "shippingDestination")
    public Collection<Order> getOrders() {
        return orders;
    }

    public void setOrders(Collection<Order> orders) {
        this.orders = orders;
    }

    private Collection<Vendor> vendors;

    @OneToMany(mappedBy = "shippingDestination")
    public Collection<Vendor> getVendors() {
        return vendors;
    }

    public void setVendors(Collection<Vendor> vendors) {
        this.vendors = vendors;
    }

    public boolean validate() throws InvalidParameterException {
        if (getRecipient() == null || getRecipient().length() == 0) {
            throw new InvalidParameterException("Address requires a recipient");
        }

        if (getStreet() == null || getStreet().length() == 0) {
            throw new InvalidParameterException("Address requires a street");
        }

        if (getCity() == null || getCity().length() == 0) {
            throw new InvalidParameterException("Address requires a city");
        }

        if (getState() == null || getState().length() == 0) {
            throw new InvalidParameterException("Address requires a state");
        }

        if (getPostalCode() == null || getPostalCode().length() == 0) {
            throw new InvalidParameterException("Address requires a postal code");
        }

        return true;
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
If you try to insert one with the same id, you'll get an exception. Is that what you mean? –  Sotirios Delimanolis Mar 1 '13 at 16:52
    
when you say it must match, what do you mean? Use a hash builder and equals builder with the parameters that you care about and hibernate should deal with it. –  joey.enfield Mar 1 '13 at 16:52
    
From a database design point of view, this seems like serious code smell. But, barring that, what stops you from putting a unique index on your table for the combination of columns that must occur only once? –  Perception Mar 1 '13 at 16:53
    
No, I mean I don't want my application to enter the same address 40 times as orders come in. If the shipping address is the same, I want it to use the one that already exists in the database. Only under certain circumstances will a shipping address ever change. I'd rather not create a ton of duplicate rows for the sake of the few circumstances where it might change. –  Webnet Mar 1 '13 at 17:03
    
Can't you just query for addresses based on the criteria that you want to be the same, then use the address object that you find, if you find one? Seems like a trivial bit of logic to me. –  Eric Galluzzo Mar 1 '13 at 18:00

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

yes, there is no such thing in spring or hibernate. If you need to check for duplicate i mean whether same information already exist or not then sure you can write a query in service or dao class.

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