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I'm having trouble using string arrays. When creating the string array, I can print the data of e.g. globals[0], but at the end of the function the application crashes when doing the same thing. Does anyone know what causes this?

#define TRUE    1
#define FALSE   0

#ifdef _MSC_VER
#define _CRT_SECURE_NO_WARNINGS
#endif

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>

char** globals; // Naam van alle globals
int* adressen; // Adres van alle globals
unsigned int index; // Plaats voor het toevoegen van globals

int InitializeGlobals(char* path)
{
    // Variabelen voor het bestand
    struct stat st;
    FILE* bestand;

    // Variabelen voor de regels in op te slaan
    char* buffer;

    // Variabelen voor strings te tellen
    unsigned int i;
    unsigned int aantal = 0;
    unsigned char b = FALSE;

    // Variabelen voor het omzetten van de buffer
    char* number;
    unsigned int grootte;
    unsigned int start;
    unsigned int tmp;

    // Debug variabelen
    int debug;

    // Bestand in de buffer lezen en sluiten
    //
    //
    bestand = fopen(path, "r");
    if (bestand == NULL) {
        printf("Kon het opgegeven bestand niet openen! globals.c/r42\n");
        return -1;
    }

    debug = stat(path, &st);
    if (debug < 0) {
        printf("Kon het opgegeven bestand niet analyzeren! globals.c/r48, return: %i\n", debug);
        return -2;
    }

    buffer = (char*)malloc(st.st_size);
    if (buffer == NULL) {
        return -3;
    }

    fread(buffer, 1, st.st_size, bestand);
    fclose(bestand);

    // Het aantal strings vinden en de arrays klaarmaken
    //
    //
    for (i = 0; i < (unsigned int)st.st_size; i++) {
        if (buffer[i] == '\n' && b == FALSE) {
            aantal++;
        }
        else {
            b = FALSE;
        }
    }

    globals = (char**)malloc(sizeof(char*)*aantal);
    adressen = (int*)malloc(sizeof(int*)*aantal);

    // Buffer omzetten naar de string array "globals" en de int array "adressen"
    //
    //
    b = FALSE;
    index = 0;
    start = 0;
    for (i = 0; i < (unsigned int)st.st_size; i++) {
        if (b == TRUE) {
            if (buffer[i] == '\n') {
                b = FALSE;
                start = i+1;
            }
        }
        else if (buffer[i] == ';') {
            b = TRUE;
        }
        else if (buffer[i] == '=') {
            grootte = (i-start);
            number = (char*)malloc(grootte);
            if (number == NULL) {
                return i+1;
            }
            memcpy(number, buffer+start, grootte);
            start = i+1;
            tmp = atoi(number);
            memcpy(&adressen[index], &tmp, 4); // application is x86 only
            index++;
            free(number);
        }
        else if (buffer[i] == '\n') {
            grootte = (i-start);
            globals[index] = (char*)malloc(grootte+1);
            if (globals[index] == NULL) {
                return i+1;
            }
            memcpy(globals[index], buffer+start, grootte); 
            globals[index][grootte] = '\0';
            start = i+1;
            printf("%s\n", globals[index]);
        }
    }

    free(buffer);
    printf("%s", globals[0]); // <-- crash

    return 0;
}
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learn to use the debugger (gdb on Linux) and compile with all warnings and debug info (gcc -Wall -g on Linux). Use a leak detector (valgrind on Linux). –  Basile Starynkevitch Mar 1 '13 at 17:14
2  
Why don't you mention the exception text? –  Michel Keijzers Mar 1 '13 at 17:14
    
Unhandled exception at 0x614616B3 (msvcr110d.dll) in app.exe: 0xC0000005: Access violation reading location 0xCDCDCDCD. –  Ruben Mar 1 '13 at 17:16
    
wtb a nullchar terminator (or several in this case). –  WhozCraig Mar 1 '13 at 17:19
1  
You mustn't cast the return value of malloc. –  user529758 Mar 1 '13 at 17:19
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2 Answers

This 0xCDCDCDCD address the debug runtime's way of marking uninitialized heap memory. So it's safe to assume that globals[0] was never initialized.

Hypothesizing how that might happen:

If your input file is empty, or if it has one line of text that line doesn't end with a newline, then you'll never allocate globals[0].

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Could you check the input file?

In the code you are expecting output at globals[0] but getting an crash.

Looking at the code, index variable is updated when the input character is '=' or '\n'. Check if the text file contains '=' before '\n'. In this case the index would be incremented and globals[] would never have memory allocated at index 0.

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