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I am trying to create a simple SSL server using Windows and OpenSSL.

#include <WS2tcpip.h> 
#include <Winsock2.h> 

#include <errno.h>
//#include <unistd.h>
#include <malloc.h>
#include <string.h>
//#include <arpa/inet.h>
//#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
//#include <netinet/in.h>
//#include <resolv.h>
#include "openssl/ssl.h"
#include "openssl/err.h"

#define FAIL    -1

int OpenListener(int port)
{   int sd;
    struct sockaddr_in addr;

    sd = socket(PF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, 0);
    //bzero(&addr, sizeof(addr));
    memset(&addr, 0, sizeof(addr));
    addr.sin_family = AF_INET;
    addr.sin_port = htons(port);
    addr.sin_addr.s_addr = INADDR_ANY;
    if ( bind(sd, (struct sockaddr*)&addr, sizeof(addr)) != 0 )
    {
        perror("can't bind port");
        abort();
    }
    if ( listen(sd, 10) != 0 )
    {
        perror("Can't configure listening port");
        abort();
    }
    return sd;
}

SSL_CTX* InitServerCTX(void)
{   const SSL_METHOD *method;
    SSL_CTX *ctx;

    OpenSSL_add_all_algorithms();  /* load & register all cryptos, etc. */
    SSL_load_error_strings();   /* load all error messages */
    method = SSLv2_server_method();  /* create new server-method instance */
    ctx = SSL_CTX_new(method);   /* create new context from method */
    if ( ctx == NULL )
    {
        ERR_print_errors_fp(stderr);
        abort();
    }
    return ctx;
}

void LoadCertificates(SSL_CTX* ctx, char* CertFile, char* KeyFile)
{
 /* set the local certificate from CertFile */
    if ( SSL_CTX_use_certificate_file(ctx, CertFile, SSL_FILETYPE_PEM) <= 0 )
    {
        ERR_print_errors_fp(stderr);
        abort();
    }
    /* set the private key from KeyFile (may be the same as CertFile) */
    if ( SSL_CTX_use_PrivateKey_file(ctx, KeyFile, SSL_FILETYPE_PEM) <= 0 )
    {
        ERR_print_errors_fp(stderr);
        abort();
    }
    /* verify private key */
    if ( !SSL_CTX_check_private_key(ctx) )
    {
        fprintf(stderr, "Private key does not match the public certificate\n");
        abort();
    }
}

void ShowCerts(SSL* ssl)
{   X509 *cert;
    char *line;

    cert = SSL_get_peer_certificate(ssl); /* Get certificates (if available) */
    if ( cert != NULL )
    {
        printf("Server certificates:\n");
        line = X509_NAME_oneline(X509_get_subject_name(cert), 0, 0);
        printf("Subject: %s\n", line);
        free(line);
        line = X509_NAME_oneline(X509_get_issuer_name(cert), 0, 0);
        printf("Issuer: %s\n", line);
        free(line);
        X509_free(cert);
    }
    else
        printf("No certificates.\n");
}

void Servlet(SSL* ssl) /* Serve the connection -- threadable */
{   char buf[1024];
    char reply[1024];
    int sd, bytes;
    const char* HTMLecho="<html><body><pre>%s</pre></body></html>\n\n";

    if ( SSL_accept(ssl) == FAIL )     /* do SSL-protocol accept */
        ERR_print_errors_fp(stderr);
    else
    {
        ShowCerts(ssl);        /* get any certificates */
        bytes = SSL_read(ssl, buf, sizeof(buf)); /* get request */
        if ( bytes > 0 )
        {
            buf[bytes] = 0;
            printf("Client msg: \"%s\"\n", buf);
            sprintf(reply, HTMLecho, buf);   /* construct reply */
            SSL_write(ssl, reply, strlen(reply)); /* send reply */
        }
        else
            ERR_print_errors_fp(stderr);
    }
    sd = SSL_get_fd(ssl);       /* get socket connection */
    SSL_free(ssl);         /* release SSL state */
    //close(sd);          /* close connection */
    closesocket(sd);          /* close connection */
}

int main(int count, char *strings[])
{
    SSL_CTX *ctx;
    int server;
    char *portnum;

    if ( count != 2 )
    {
        printf("Usage: %s <portnum>\n", strings[0]);
        exit(0);
    }
    SSL_library_init();

    portnum = strings[1];
    ctx = InitServerCTX();        /* initialize SSL */
    LoadCertificates(ctx, "server.crt", "server.key"); /* load certs */
    server = OpenListener(atoi(portnum));    /* create server socket */
    while (1)
    {   struct sockaddr_in addr;
        socklen_t len = sizeof(addr);
        SSL *ssl;

        int client = accept(server, (struct sockaddr*)&addr, &len);  /* accept connection as usual */
        printf("Connection: %s:%d\n",inet_ntoa(addr.sin_addr), ntohs(addr.sin_port));
        ssl = SSL_new(ctx);              /* get new SSL state with context */
        SSL_set_fd(ssl, client);      /* set connection socket to SSL state */
        Servlet(ssl);         /* service connection */
    }
    //close(server);          /* close server socket */
    closesocket(server);          /* close server socket */
    SSL_CTX_free(ctx);         /* release context */
}

And application stops in this code.

if ( bind(sd, (struct sockaddr*)&addr, sizeof(addr)) != 0 )
{
    perror("can't bind port");
    abort();
}
  • Windows 7 x64
  • Visual C++ 2012
  • Win32 OpenSSL v1.0.1e

It looks like your post is mostly code; please add some more details.

I don't know what I have to add yet.

share|improve this question
2  
It 'stops'? Or fails? What port are you trying to bind to? Have you checked, that it's still available? –  Refugnic Eternium Mar 1 '13 at 17:32
1  
Well yes. So it 'fails' with that error message, yeah? ('stop' would mean, that it simply stops...meaning that the program gets stuck at that place. –  Refugnic Eternium Mar 1 '13 at 17:35
2  
what error message? note too that you don't have a 'failing SSL server', you have a failing server - this has nothing to do with SSL. –  KevinDTimm Mar 1 '13 at 17:38
2  
rewrite your code, get the server part working first and then add features like SSL. TCP/IP servers are so simple as to be silly (google is your friend) and so you're clearly not giving anyone enough information to solve your problem. Remove the SSL code, show the server code and tell us what actual error you receive. –  KevinDTimm Mar 1 '13 at 17:51
2  
No, it's not. You're lacking the main method, where the program begins. Where you would initialize your WinSock library. Do you have these code lines anywhere? WSADATA wsaData; WSAStartup(MAKEWORD(2,2), &wsaData); –  Refugnic Eternium Mar 1 '13 at 18:43

2 Answers 2

Just for completeness sake:

Under Windows, it is necessary to initialize the networking stack (WinSock) like this:

WSADATA wsaData;
int iResult;

// Initialize Winsock
iResult = WSAStartup(MAKEWORD(2,2), &wsaData);
if (iResult != 0) {
    printf("WSAStartup failed: %d\n", iResult);
    return 1;
}

You must also not forget to call WSACleanup once you're done with the networking stack to free the remaining resources.

share|improve this answer

So, I refactored your code, removing all the crap you didn't need (as was suggested) and found the problem.

portnum = strings[1];

This almost certainly evaluates to zero, so your program is attempting to bind to port 0. It's unknown what value is inserted here, but I'm sure it's not what you expect.

Incorrect!!!!!!

instead, the line should be:

portnum = strings(strings[1]);

Additionally, by convention, when people write 'C' programs, the signature of main is:

int main (int argc, char **argv) 

OR

int main (int argc, char *argv[])

using those variable names (argc & argv)

Please follow this convention for your sake and the sake of those who follow behind you. What this means is that your portnum line s/b:

portnum = atoi(argv[1]);

By the way, don't forget the WSADATA/WSAStartup bits that Refugnic Eternium suggested also.

share|improve this answer
    
Replace argv[1] by argv[argv[1]]? For what? I can write OpenListener(2323) instead of OpenListener(atoi(portnum)) and nothing will be changed. –  Ufx Mar 1 '13 at 20:00
1  
Actually, port 0 is quite possible and shouldn't cause the bind to fail. binding to port 0 will give you a random port, which you need to query to be actually effective. Not the desirable behaviour, but it's still valid. –  Refugnic Eternium Mar 1 '13 at 21:01
    
@RefugnicEternium - true. Upon further review, I'm guessing that the port is some other value - I don't have a gcc handy this minute, but it would be interesting to see the error :) –  KevinDTimm Mar 1 '13 at 21:19
    
To the OP, since your program wasn't going to work without both the fixes from me & Refugnic, I'd recommend you vote them both up and find a way to split the accept. –  KevinDTimm Mar 1 '13 at 22:26

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