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With the following code:

case "GETSITES":
case "SITESETUP":
    MessageBox.Show("Help! I am suffering from the Air-Conditioned Nightmare!!!");
    // ...

Will the MessageBox.Show be executed either the switch value is "GETSITES" or "SITESETUP"?

Or only if the switch value is "SITESETUP"?

Since "GETSITES" has no break, I'm thinking yes, but am not sure.


UPDATE

I guess the way I should have worded my question as:

Are these two code fragments semantically equivalent?

  • fragment 1

    case 0:
    case 1:
        // bla bla bla;
        break;
    
  • fragment 2(pseudo code)

    case 0, 1:
        // bla bla bla;
        break;
    
share|improve this question

closed as too localized by Mike Edenfield, Eng.Fouad, SztupY, WiredPrairie, Steve Mar 1 '13 at 22:04

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

15  
why not give it a try? It would have taken less time/effort for you to try this out than to ask here.. – Mike Dinescu Mar 1 '13 at 18:21
2  
Yes. (15 chars) – GalacticCowboy Mar 1 '13 at 18:21
1  
You don't have an "empty" case you have two cases that display the exact same message. Since it seems you didn't even run this code to verify your theory I have to issue a downvote. Good questions are those questions the author researches before asking. – Ramhound Mar 1 '13 at 18:47
1  
Hi Clay...with something and fundamental as this why not write a small console application to test this. Then if there's something you aren't comprehending about the outcome ask about that. Thanks. – Kev Mar 2 '13 at 17:23
3  
Those fragments are not equivalent because the second one is not legal. – Eric Lippert Mar 4 '13 at 14:45
up vote 6 down vote accepted

What you are describing is having two labels for the same case. C# does allow this. You cannot, however, fall through to the next case statement in the same way that C allows, that is, your label cannot have some code, then fall through to the next case statement. That is forbidden and will cause a compilation error.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I know you can do "case 0, 1, 2: Bla;break:" My question is, do the empty cases just get ignored (if so, why do they exist - just to show you have considered them?) – B. Clay Shannon Mar 1 '13 at 19:21
    
@ClayShannon Consider the case where you have two, non-default options that are treated identically with respect to a particular switch statement. In that case you can either repeat the code for each case or use two (or more) labels that map onto the same code. Omitting the label would cause the (incorrect) default label to be taken. – tvanfosson Mar 1 '13 at 19:27
    
Okay, but I thought the syntax for that was "case 0,1,2: Bla;break;" not "case 0: case 1: case 2: Bla;break;" – B. Clay Shannon Mar 1 '13 at 19:41
    
@ClayShannon - no, your first example isn't valid syntax in C#. A case statement can have one and only one constant value, msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/vstudio/06tc147t.aspx – tvanfosson Mar 1 '13 at 20:09

Do empty case statements in C# combine with the next non-empty one?

I originally said:

The question supposes a falsehood. There is no such thing as an empty switch section in a legal C# program.

That is not quite true. The C# specification requires that a switch section contain at least one statement, but the implementation actually does not.

I emend my statement as follows:

The question supposes that there is an empty switch section (note that switch sections are not statements), but there can only be an empty switch section in a very unusual situation. First off, let's clearly describe the anatomy of a switch statement.

When you have:

switch(x) 
{ 
   case 1: 
   case 2: 
       Console.WriteLine("Hello");
       break;
}

there is only one switch section. There is no "empty section" following case 1; a section consists of all the case clauses followed by zero or more statements. (The spec requires one or more statements but the implementation actually allows zero statements.) The statement list must have a non-reachable endpoint.

The only way for there to be an empty statement list whose end point is not reachable inside a switch section is for the switch section itself to be unreachable. There are two ways that can happen. Either the entire switch can be unreachable, or the switch can be switching on a constant. In short, the only way to make an empty switch section is either:

switch(1) { case 2: }

or

if (false) switch(x) { case 2: }

Neither is legal according to the spec, but the C# compiler allows both. Fortunately this is a pretty harmless bug.

In both cases the end point of the section is not reachable and so the empty section is reachable. But it is never the case that there is an empty section between cases.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the terminology non-reachable endpoint! – Ken Kin Mar 1 '13 at 23:06
    
@KenKin: You're welcome. In case it is not clear, by having a "non reachable endpoint" I mean that a statement must be a break, continue, goto, throw or return -- all of which transfer control elsewhere -- or a provable infinite loop, like while(true) {}. – Eric Lippert Mar 1 '13 at 23:11
    
Out of curiosity, is switch (1) { case 2: } a legal statement in C#? It compiles without error in VS2012, but it appears to have a switch section with an empty statement list. (I understand that switch (1) { case 2: ; } would be legal because the statement list is unreachable, and I realize that the behavior of unreachable empty code is not especially important, but I'm curious whether I'm misreading the spec or whether the compiler differs from the spec here.) – Quartermeister Mar 5 '13 at 20:10
2  
Thanks! But I guess I'm misreading the spec then, because it defines switch-section: switch-labels statement-list and statement-list: statement | statement-list statement, so I would think that switch (1) { case 2: } shouldn't even parse because the statement-list is missing. – Quartermeister Mar 5 '13 at 22:25
3  
Good heavens you are right again. This is a bug. The spec requires that the switch section be non-empty. I can't believe I've never noticed that before. – Eric Lippert Mar 5 '13 at 22:37

Based on testing, you can do the following:

switch(i)
{
    case 0:
    case 1:
    case 2:
        doSomething();
        break;
    default:
        doNothing();
        break;
}

but you cannot:

switch(i)
{
   case 0:
      doSomething();
   case 1:
      doSomethingElse();
      break;
   default:
      doNothing();
      break;
}

So, the answer is, YES, you can stack multiple cases together, but you cannot let control run from one case to another.

share|improve this answer
5  
Though you can end the "case 0" switch section with goto case 1;. Little known fact, but true! – Eric Lippert Mar 1 '13 at 19:36

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