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I have an HTML problem that is pretty tricky and I'm not sure there is a CSS-based solution for it. Basically I have a three column grid. The first and third columns can contain a variable number of rows in them. The second column always has exactly one row. Each row has a minimum height.

So the column with the most rows will have all the rows with height set to the minimum height. The rows in the other columns should expand equally in height to take up the remaining space.

Say that column one has three rows, each 50px tall. Column two must have one row 150px tall. If column three has 2 rows they must each be 75px tall. Below are some pictures to further illustrate what I'm after.

Is this even possible with CSS?

enter image description here

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You can probably do by using a standard "css equal height columns" solution, then adding 50/50 and 33/33/33 divs inside those columns to further subdivide. –  Marc B Mar 1 '13 at 18:23
    
@MarcB No he can't do that, because he has an undefined amount of rows in the divs. Do he can't divide the height beforehand. That looks like the need for javascript. –  Sven Bieder Mar 1 '13 at 18:25
    
@sven: true enough, but then the js would simply set height=totalheight/#rows in the css dynamically. the equal columns wrapper still holds –  Marc B Mar 1 '13 at 18:27
    
@OP: Do you need the same numer of rows, or just height of all the 3 divs next to each other to be the same? –  Maciej Gurban Mar 1 '13 at 18:28
    
The number of rows in the first and third columns is independent and can be anywhere from 1 to 5. So column one could have 2 rows and column three could have 5 rows. Column two always has 1 row. All rows within a single column must have the same height. –  user1334007 Mar 1 '13 at 18:40

3 Answers 3

If you don't mind only working in a small handful of browsers, then you can absolutely do this with pure CSS. Go ahead, add and remove as many grandchild divs as you want:

http://codepen.io/cimmanon/pen/ldmtJ

/* line 5, ../sass/test.scss */
.wrapper {
  display: -webkit-flexbox;
  display: -ms-flexbox;
  display: -webkit-flex;
}
@supports (display: flex) and (flex-wrap: wrap) {
  /* line 5, ../sass/test.scss */
  .wrapper {
    display: flex;
  }
}

/* line 9, ../sass/test.scss */
.a, .b, .c {
  display: -webkit-flexbox;
  display: -ms-flexbox;
  display: -webkit-flex;
  -webkit-flex-flow: row wrap;
  -ms-flex-flow: row wrap;
  flex-flow: row wrap;
}
@supports (display: flex) and (flex-wrap: wrap) {
  /* line 9, ../sass/test.scss */
  .a, .b, .c {
    display: flex;
  }
}
/* line 13, ../sass/test.scss */
.a div, .b div, .c div {
  border: 1px solid;
  -webkit-flex: 1 0 100%;
  -ms-flex: 1 0 100%;
  flex: 1 0 100%;
}

/* Fancy it up! */
/* line 21, ../sass/test.scss */
.a {
  background: #ff9999;
  -webkit-flex: 1 1 10em;
  -ms-flex: 1 1 10em;
  flex: 1 1 10em;
}

/* line 26, ../sass/test.scss */
.b {
  background: #00e600;
  -webkit-flex: 1 1 10em;
  -ms-flex: 1 1 10em;
  flex: 1 1 10em;
}

/* line 31, ../sass/test.scss */
.c {
  background: #9999ff;
  -webkit-flex: 1 1 40%;
  -ms-flex: 1 1 40%;
  flex: 1 1 40%;
}

<div class="wrapper">
  <div class="a">
    <div>a</div>
    <div>a</div>
    <div>a</div>
    <div>a</div>
    <div>a</div>
  </div>

  <div class="b">
    <div>b</div>
  </div>

  <div class="c">
    <div>c</div>
    <div>c</div>
  </div>
</div>

Browser support: Opera, Chrome, IE10. When Firefox finally gets around to finishing supporting the current Flexbox draft including flex-wrap, then it will work there as well.

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point for an accurate answer even though I didn't go with this solution. –  user1334007 Mar 1 '13 at 19:10

You will basically have to fake it. You will need to be sure that the three columns have wrappers - and that there is one wrapper around the whole thing. Then you can do something like CSS Faux columns to make the second column appear as tall as the other two.

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1  
That doesn't solve his problem, because the content will not get adjusted. As you have said faux columns only fake a height per background. The main problem is to figure out the height for each row. –  Sven Bieder Mar 1 '13 at 18:28
1  
True, I was going for the 'sleight of hand' approach, and I didn't truly grasp what the OP was after. To truly do this, the OP will have to rely on JS to make such calculations. So, no, this is not possible with vanilla CSS. –  chipcullen Mar 1 '13 at 18:30
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Per recommendations by a few folks, I ended up using some simple javascript to get this done:

$(document).ready(function() {
   var c1Rows = $(".col1 .row").length;
   var c3Rows = $(".col3 .row").length;

   var minHeight = 50;
   var max = Math.max(c1Rows, c3Rows);
   var totalHeight = max * minHeight;

   $(".col1 .row").css("height", totalHeight / c1Rows);
   $(".col2 .row").css("height", totalHeight);
   $(".col3 .row").css("height", totalHeight / c3Rows);
});
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