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I have two primary threads. One spawns new threads and the other listens for results, like so:

//Spawner
while(!done) {
    spawnNewProcess(nextId, parameters);

    myListener.listenFor(nextId);

    nextId ++;
}

The spawnNewProcess method takes a widely variable amount of time. When it finishes, it will put a result object into a map that can be accessed by Id.

The listener thread runs like so:

//Listener
while(!done) {
    for (int id : toListenFor) {
        if (resultMap.contains(id)) {
            result = resultMap.get(id);

            toListenFor.remove(id);

            process(result);
        }
    }
}

I can't change the spawnNewProcess method, nor how it stores results. What I want to do is set a maximum limit on how many can be going concurrently. My first inclination would be to just have a variable track that number. If the max would be exceeded, then the spawner waits. When a result comes back, the listener will notify it. Like this:

//Spawner2

AtomicInteger numSpawns = new AtomicInteger(0);
int maxSpawns = 10;

while(!done) {
    if (numSpawns.intValue() >= maxSpawns) {
        this.wait(0);
    }
    numSpawns.getAndIncrement;

    spawnNewProcess(nextId, parameters);

    myListener.listenFor(nextId);

    nextId ++;
}

And the Listener be:

//Listener2
while(!done) {
    for (int id : toListenFor) {
        if (resultMap.contains(id)) {
            result = resultMap.get(id);

            toListenFor.remove(id);

            numSpawns.getAndDecrement();
            Spawner.notify();

            process(result);
        }
    }
}

Will this work? Are there potential deadlocks that I'm missing? It wouldn't be a huge deal if somehow 11 or 9 spawns were running at the same time instead of 10. Or is there a much better way that I'm oblivious to?

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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use a Semaphore.

import java.util.concurrent.Semaphore;
private Semaphore sem = new Semaphore(NUM_MAX_CONCURRENT);

// Spawner
while(!done) {

    sem.acquire(); // added by corsiKa

    spawnNewProcess(nextId, parameters);

    myListener.listenFor(nextId);

    nextId ++;
}

// listener
while(!done) {
    for (int id : toListenFor) {
        if (resultMap.contains(id)) {
            result = resultMap.get(id);

            toListenFor.remove(id);
            sem.release(); // added by corsiKa
            process(result);
        }
    }
}
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Perfect, thanks! –  fake fake Mar 1 '13 at 20:49
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To control the number of spawners running, use a Executors.newFixedThreadPool(size), which will always run no more than a fixed amount of tasks at once. Then wrap the spawning tasks in a Runnable and pass them to the ExecutorService.

while(!done) {
    task = new Runnable() { public void run() {
        spawnNewProcess(nextId, parameters);
    } });

    exec.submit(task);;

    nextId ++;
}

To get the results back, use a SynchronousQueue or ConcurrentLinkedQueue, which will allow you to pass objects between threads without using lower-level concurrency objects.

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Can't. The spawnNewProcess method actually contains the call to start it's own thread, and I can't modify it. –  fake fake Mar 1 '13 at 20:48
    
then talk to the author :) –  Ralf H Mar 1 '13 at 20:52
    
Yeah, I'm not a huge fan of jumping through hoops to use a crazy API. I usually just fork and rewrite the API. :) That function should really just return a Runnable. –  Andrew Mao Mar 1 '13 at 20:54
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