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I am trying to use ddply with transform to populate a new variable (summary_Date) in a dataframe with variables ID and Date. The value of the variable is chosen based on the length of the piece that is being evaluated using ifelse:

If there are less than five observations for an ID in a given month, I want to have summary_Date be calculated by rounding the date to the nearest month (using round_date from package lubridate); if there are more than five observations for an ID in a given month, I want the summary_Date to simply be Date.

require(plyr)
require(lubridate)

test.df <- structure(
  list(ID = c(1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1,1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1
                , 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2,2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2)
       , Date = structure(c(-247320000, -246196800, -245073600, -243864000
                            , -242654400, -241444800, -126273600, -123595200
                            , -121176000, -118497600, 1359385200, 1359388800
                            , 1359392400, 1359396000, 1359399600, 1359403200
                            , 1359406800, 1359410400, 1359414000, 1359417600
                            , 55598400, 56116800, 58881600, 62078400, 64756800
                            , 67348800, 69854400, 72964800, 76161600, 79012800
                            , 1358589600, 1358676000, 1358762400, 1358848800
                            , 1358935200, 1359021600, 1359108000, 1359194400
                            , 1359280800, 1359367200), tzone = "GMT"
                          , class = c("POSIXct", "POSIXt"))
       , Val=rnorm(40))
  , .Names = c("ID", "Date", "Val"), row.names = c(NA, 40L)
  , class = "data.frame")

test.df <- ddply(test.df, .(ID, floor_date(Date, "month")), transform
                 , summary_Date=as.POSIXct(ifelse(length(ID)<5
                                                  , round_date(Date, "month")
                                                  ,Date)
                                           , origin="1970-01-01 00:00.00"
                                           , tz="GMT")
                 # Included length_x to easily see the length of the subset
                 , length_x = length(ID))

head(test.df,5)
#   floor_date(Date, "month") ID                Date        Val summary_Date length_x
# 1                1962-03-01  1 1962-03-01 12:00:00 -0.1037988   1962-03-01        3
# 2                1962-03-01  1 1962-03-14 12:00:00  0.2923056   1962-03-01        3
# 3                1962-03-01  1 1962-03-27 12:00:00  0.4435410   1962-03-01        3
# 4                1962-04-01  1 1962-04-10 12:00:00  0.1159164   1962-04-01        2
# 5                1962-04-01  1 1962-04-24 12:00:00  2.9824075   1962-04-01        2

The ifelse statement seems to be working, but the value in 'summary_Date' seems to be the first value calculated for the subset that transform is working on, rather than the row-specific value. For example in row 3, summary_Date should be 1962-04-01 because the date 1962-03-27 12:00:00' should be rounded up (because there are fewer than five rows in the subset), but instead the first calculated value of summary_Date (1962-03-01) is repeated in all rows in that subset.

EDIT: I was inspired by Ricardo's answer using data.table to try it in two steps with ddply. It works also:

test.df <- ddply(test.df, .(ID, floor_date(Date, "month")), transform
                 , length_x = length(ID))

test.df <- ddply(test.df, .(ID, floor_date(Date, "month")), transform
                 , summary_Date=as.POSIXct(ifelse(length_x<5
                                                  , round_date(Date, "month")
                                                  ,Date)
                                           , origin="1970-01-01 00:00.00"
                                           , tz="GMT"))

head(test.df,5)[c(1,3:7)]
#   floor_date(Date, "month") ID                Date        Val length_x summary_Date
# 1                1962-03-01  1 1962-03-01 12:00:00 -0.1711212        3   1962-03-01
# 2                1962-03-01  1 1962-03-14 12:00:00 -0.1531571        3   1962-03-01
# 3                1962-03-01  1 1962-03-27 12:00:00  0.1256238        3   1962-04-01
# 4                1962-04-01  1 1962-04-10 12:00:00  1.4481225        2   1962-04-01
# 5                1962-04-01  1 1962-04-24 12:00:00 -0.6508731        2   1962-05-01
share|improve this question
    
Hi @AndyT, I'm a bit confused: You are saying that row 4, summary_Date should be 1962-04-01 -- which is the value that you have in your output. I'm not seeing what the error is? –  Ricardo Saporta Mar 1 '13 at 19:27
1  
Whoops - that's my mistake. I mean row 3. 1962-03-27 should be rounded up to 1962-04-01 because there are fewer than 5 rows in the subset. I've edited it. –  andyteucher Mar 1 '13 at 19:32
    
Can you elaborate on what you are counting? Is it the number of ID's per a given month? –  Ricardo Saporta Mar 1 '13 at 19:36
    
It is the number of IDs in a given month for a given ID; i.e., the length of the vector ID in the subset for a given ID and month (I could have chosen any of the data frame columns). Normally I would use nrow(x) where x is the subset that transform is working on in each iteration of ddply, but I don't have a dataframe name to pass to nrow. –  andyteucher Mar 1 '13 at 19:40
    
Use mutate instead of transform, and you can combine the two ddply calls into one. The difference is that mutate respects newly created columns, while transform does not. –  Ramnath Mar 1 '13 at 20:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

One Step ddply solution (also posted as comment)

ddply(test.df, .(ID, floor_date(Date, "month")), mutate, 
  length_x = length(ID), 
  summary_Date=as.POSIXct(ifelse(length_x < 5, round_date(Date, "month") ,Date)
    , origin="1970-01-01 00:00.00", tz="GMT")
)
share|improve this answer
    
+1! I was unfamiliar with mutate –  Ricardo Saporta Mar 1 '13 at 20:22
    
Brilliant, thanks Ramnath. I tried this using transform and obviously got the error of length_x not found. I didn't know about mutate, so thanks for that! –  andyteucher Mar 1 '13 at 20:23
    
I also see in the help for mutate that it is faster than transform - nice for me here because the data frame I'm dealing with is rather large and this operation is quite slow with transform. –  andyteucher Mar 1 '13 at 20:25
3  
For large data frames, I would go with data.table since it is usually orders faster than plyr. –  Ramnath Mar 1 '13 at 20:29
# transform to data.table
library(data.table)
test.dt <- data.table(test.df)

# calculate length of id by month-year. 
test.dt[, idlen := length(ID),  by=list(month(Date), year(Date)) ]

# calculate the summary date
test.dt[, summary_Date := ifelse(idlen<5, as.Date(round_date(Date, "month")), as.Date(Date))]

# If you would like to have it formatted add the following: 
test.dt[, summary_Date := as.Date(summary_Date, origin="1970-01-01")]

Results:

 > test.dt
    ID                Date         Val idlen summary_Date
 1:  1 1962-03-01 12:00:00  0.42646422     3   1962-03-01
 2:  1 1962-03-14 12:00:00 -0.29507148     3   1962-03-01
 3:  1 1962-03-27 12:00:00  0.89512566     3   1962-04-01   <~~~~~
 4:  1 1962-04-10 12:00:00  0.87813349     2   1962-04-01
 5:  1 1962-04-24 12:00:00  0.82158108     2   1962-05-01
 6:  1 1962-05-08 12:00:00  0.68864025     1   1962-05-01


UPDATE:

Explanation of why two steps are needed

The reason it cannot be done in one step has to do with the fact that you are only getting a single value per group. When you assign that value to the members of the group, you are assigning 1 element to many. R knows how to handle such situations very well: recycling the single element.

However, in this specifica case, you do not want to recycle; Rather, you do not want to apply the 1 element to many. Therefore, you need unique groups, which is what we do in the second step. Each element (row) of the group then gets assigned its own, specific value.

UPDATE 2:

@Ramnath gave a great suggestion of using mutate. Taking a look at ?mutate, it gives:

This function is very similar to transform but it executes the transformations iteratively ... later transformations can use the columns created by earlier transformations

Which is exactly what you want to do!

share|improve this answer
    
This did do it - thanks Ricardo. Your answer led me to trying it with ddply in two steps like you did with data.table. It works that way as well - see my edit in my original post. I'm still not sure why it can't be done in one step, but I will go with this for now. –  andyteucher Mar 1 '13 at 20:00
1  
@AndyT, glad to help. Please see edit for explanation –  Ricardo Saporta Mar 1 '13 at 20:10

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